Monthly Archives: March 2007

Banality of Heroism

Wow! I’m speechless!

Open Source » Blog Archive » The Banality of Evil, Part II

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Social Networking and eLearning

Oops! I did it again. Launched on one of my long-winded ramblings about the convergence between learning management systems (in this case, Moodle) and social networking sites (in this case, Facebook).

Executive summary:

Facebook’s power’s in fluid, organic networks. Moodle’s power’s in structured but flexible learning-based groups. I personally see a marriage made in heaven.

Lounge: Moodle as New Facebook


Views and Feeds

Yep! One of those blogposts about blogging.

This is somewhat interesting. For some reason, I’m getting much fewer daily views on this blog but I’m getting a lot more feed views, a good proportion of which come from Google Feedfetcher. Maybe WordPress.com has changed its usage statistics to switch Feedfetcher to feeds instead of views or maybe it’s just a coincidence. But it’s fun to think about what happens with this blog.

Actually, I feel I’m getting more interaction with readers, which is what I’ve been missing. I still won’t constrain myself to writing very short blog entries, but I like what this blog is giving me, at this point.

OTOH, I have been posting just a bit more than I used to on some of my Blogger/Blogspot blogs:

Part of the reason I blog there more is because of ease of use. Since Google is so ubiquitous, some sites make it very easy to blog an item on Blogger. I mostly tend to use bookmarklets but I’ve been trying the “BlogThis!” buttons on some services, like Flickr and DailyMotion.

Of course, none of this should get in the way of the work I have to do (which is, in fact, quite a bit). And it still doesn’t.

I’ve also spent a bit more time on Facebook. Not much (maybe an hour a week) but it does shift my online activities a bit.

All of this relates to my notion that blogging and other participatory aspects of the online world should merge. In fact, I kind of like the fact that I can insert blog feeds in Facebook and Moodle


YMMV

Best use of the expression “Your mileage may vary.”

Boing Boing: Google’s driving direx from New York to Dublin, Ireland

LOL!


Humanistic Sociocentrism

There must be a common term for this and it is certainly well-known. A kind of wishful thinking of the trailblazer type. A combination of utopianism, humanism, naïveté, forward-thinking, and ethnocentrism. You wish for society to change in a given way, you predict that society will eventually switch to that direction, you wait patiently for social changes to happen, and you eventually notice that you’re in the minority.

Been thinking about “dreamers” («rêveurs», in Amélie), artists, idealists, intellectuals, marginals, elites, trend-setters. May even consider myself part of that group, somehow. A tiny minority. Running the gamut from hyper-specialist to Renaissance-type polymath. Getting jobs in different sectors but mostly in fields such as business, academia, expressive culture, or diplomacy.

Using the pattern of “ethnocentrism,” sociocentrism as social limits on thinking. Not necessarily thinking your social class to be better than others. But failing to notice that members of other social groups (in this case, the majority groups) may not think along the same lines as you do.

It might be what prevents some people to become successful politicians. Social life might be better that way.


Cell Phones and Emergency Contacts

‘ICE’ Cell Phone Plan Would Help Rescuers

Cell users are being urged to put the acronym ICE — “in case of emergency” — before the names of the people they want to designate as next of kin in their cell address book, creating entries such as “ICE — Dad” or “ICE — Alison.”

Seems like a great idea. Can’t think of a reason not to do it…


OLPC WiFi?

Intel modifies Wi-Fi to add mileage | CNET News.com

The system isn’t designed for the U.S. or Europe. Instead, it is part of the chip giant’s efforts to bring computing technologies to people in emerging markets. The communications infrastructure in most of these countries is fairly anemic and most of it is concentrated in cities. Villages, where a large portion of the population lives, are effectively cut off from the outside world except by car, bus or footpath.

Glad to see as much emphasis on “emerging markets” from tech sectors. Either the OLPC trailblazed for this to happen or it embedded itself in a broader process of acknowledging the needs of those societies with lesser GNPs…