Category Archives: Québec

Jazz and Identity: Comment on Lydon’s Iyer Interview

Radio Open Source » Blog Archive » Vijay Iyer’s Life in Music: “Striving is the Back Story…”.

Sounds like it will be a while before the United States becomes a truly post-racial society.

Iyer can define himself as American and he can even one-up other US citizens in Americanness, but he’s still defined by his having “a Brahmin Indian name and heritage, and a Yale degree in physics.”

Something by which I was taken aback, at IU Bloomington ten years ago, is the fact that those who were considered to be “of color” (as if colour were the factor!) were expected to mostly talk about their “race” whereas those who were considered “white” were expected to remain silent when notions of “race” and ethnicity came up for discussion. Granted, ethnicity and “race” were frequently discussed, so it was possible to hear the voices of those “of color” on a semi-regular basis. Still, part of my culture shock while living in the MidWest was the conspicuous silence of students with brilliant ideas who happened to be considered African-American.

Something similar happened with gender, on occasion, in that women were strongly encouraged to speak out…when a gender angle was needed. Thankfully, some of these women (at least, among those whose “racial” identity was perceived as neutral) did speak up, regardless of topic. But there was still an expectation that when they did, their perspective was intimately gendered.

Of course, some gender lines were blurred: the gender ratio among faculty members was relatively balanced (probably more women than men), the chair of the department was a woman for a time, and one department secretary was a man. But women’s behaviours were frequently interpreted in a gender-specific way, while men were often treated as almost genderless. Male privilege manifested itself in the fact that it was apparently difficult for women not to be gender-conscious.

Those of us who were “international students” had the possibility to decide when our identities were germane to the discussion. At least, I was able to push my «différence» when I so pleased, often by becoming the token Francophone in discussions about Francophone scholars, yet being able not to play the “Frenchie card” when I didn’t find it necessary. At the same time, my behaviour may have been deemed brash and a fellow student teased me by calling me “Mr. Snottyhead.” As an instructor later told me, “it’s just that, since you’re Canadian, we didn’t expect you to be so different.” (My response: “I know some Canadians who would despise that comment. But since I’m Québécois, it doesn’t matter.”) This was in reference to a seminar with twenty students, including seven “internationals”: one Zimbabwean, one Swiss-German, two Koreans, one Japanese, one Kenyan, and one “Québécois of Swiss heritage.” In this same graduate seminar, the instructor expected everyone to know of Johnny Appleseed and of John Denver.

Again, a culture shock. Especially for someone coming from a context in which the ethnic identity of the majority is frequently discussed and in which cultural identity is often “achieved” instead of being ascribed. This isn’t to say that Quebec society is devoid of similar issues. Everybody knows, Quebec has more than its fair share of identity-based problems. The fact of the matter is, Quebec society is entangled in all sorts of complex identity issues, and for many of those, Quebec may appear underprepared. The point is precisely that, in Quebec, identity politics is a matter for everyone. Nobody has the luxury to treat their identity as “neutral.”

Going back to Iyer… It’s remarkable that his thoughtful comments on Jazz end up associated more with his background than with his overall approach. As if what he had to say were of a different kind than those from Roy Hayes or Robin Kelley. As if Iyer had more in common with Koo Nimo than with, say, Sonny Rollins. Given Lydon’s journalistic background, it’s probably significant that the Iyer conversation carried the “Life in Music” name of  the show’s music biography series yet got “filed under” the show’s “Year of India” series. I kid you not.

And this is what we hear at the end of each episode’s intro:

This is Open Source, from the Watson Institute at Brown University. An American conversation with Global attitude, we call it.

Guess the “American” part was taken by Jazz itself, so Iyer was assigned the “Global” one. Kind of wishing the roles were reversed, though Iyer had rehearsed his part.

But enough symbolic interactionism. For now.

During Lydon’s interview with Iyer, I kept being reminded of a conversation (in Brookline)  with fellow Canadian-ethnomusicologist-and-Jazz-musician Tanya Kalmanovitch. Kalmanovitch had fantastic insight to share on identity politics at play through the international (yet not post-national) Jazz scene. In fact, methinks she’d make a great Open Source guest. She lives in Brooklyn but works as assistant chair of contemporary improv at NEC, in B-Town, so Lydon could probably meet her locally.

Anyhoo…

In some ways, Jazz is more racialized and ethnicized now than it was when Howie Becker published Outsiders. (hey, I did hint symbolic interactionism’d be back!). It’s also very national, gendered, compartmentalized… In a word: modern. Of course, Jazz (or something like it) shall play a role in postmodernity. But only if it sheds itself of its modernist trappings. We should hear out Kevin Mahogany’s (swung) comments about a popular misconception:

Some cats work from nine to five
Change their life for line of jive
Never had foresight to see
Where the changes had to be
Thought that they had heard the word
Thought it all died after Bird
But we’re still swingin’

The following anecdote seems à propos.

Branford Marsalis quartet on stage outside at the Indy Jazz Fest 1999. Some dude in the audience starts heckling the band: “Play something we know!” Marsalis, not losing his cool, engaged the heckler in a conversation on Jazz history, pushing the envelope, playing the way you want to play, and expected behaviour during shows. Though the audience sounded divided when Marsalis advised the heckler to go to Chaka Khan‘s show on the next stage over, if that was more to the heckler’s liking, there wasn’t a major shift in the crowd and, hopefully, most people understood how respectful Marsalis’s comments really were. What was especially precious is when Marsalis asked the heckler: “We’re cool, man?”

It’s nothing personal.


Happiness Anniversary

HappyTweet

A year ago today, I found out that I was, in fact, happy.

Continue reading


A Glocal Network of City-States?

This one should probably be in a fictive mode, maybe even in a science-fiction genre. In fact, I’m reconnecting with literature after a long hiatus and now would be an interesting time to start writing fiction. But I’ll still start this as one of those  “ramblings” blogposts that I tend to build or which tend to come to me.

The reason this should be fiction is that it might sound exceedingly naïve, especially for a social scientist. I tend to “throw ideas out there” and see what sticks to other ideas, but this broad idea about which I’ve been thinking for a while may sound rather crazy, quaint, unsophisticated.

See, while my academic background is rather solid, I don’t have formal training in political science. In fact, I’ve frequently avoided several academic activities related to political science as a discipline. Or to journalism as a discipline. Part of my reluctance to involve myself in academic activities related political science relates to my reaction to journalism. The connection may not seem obvious to everyone but I see political science as a discipline in the same frame, and participating in the same worldview, as what I find problematic in journalism.

The simplest way to contextualize this connection is the (“modern”) notion of the “Nation-State.” That context involves me personally. As an anthropologist, as a post-modernist, as a “dual citizen” of two countries, as a folklorist, as a North American with a relatively salient European background, as a “citizen of the World,” and as a member of a community which has switched in part from a “nationalist” movement to other notions of statehood. Simply put: I sincerely think that the notion of a “Nation-State” is outdated and that it will (whether it should or not) give way to other social constructs.

A candidate to replace the conceptual apparatus of the “Nation-State” is both global and local, both post-modern and ancient: a glocal network of city-states (GNoCS).

Yes, I know, it sounds awkward. No, I’m not saying that things would necessarily be better in a post-national world. And I have no idea when this shift from the “nation-states” frame to a network of city-states may happen. But I sincerely think that it could happen. And that it could happen rather quickly.

Not that the shift would be so radical as to obliterate the notion of “nation-state” overnight. In this case, I’m closer to Foucault’s épistémè than to Kuhn’s paradigm. After all, while the “Democratic Nation-State” model is global, former social structures are still present around the Globe and the very notion of a “Nation-State” takes different values in different parts of the world. What I envision has less to do with the linear view of history than with a perspective in which different currents of social change interact with one another over time, evoking shifts in polarity for those who hold a binary perspective on social issues.

I started “working on” this post four months ago. I was just taking some notes in a blog draft, in view of a blogpost, instead of simply keeping general notes, as I tend to do. This post remained on my mind and I’ve been accumulating different threads which can connect to my basic idea. I now realize that this blogpost will be more of a placeholder for further thinking than a “milestone” in my reflection on the topic. My reluctance to publish this blog entry had as much to do with an idiosyncratic sense of prudence as with time-management or any other issue. In other words, I was wary of sticking my neck out. Which might explain why this post is so personal as compared to most of my posts in English.

As uninformed as I may seem of the minutiae of national era political science, I happen to think that there’s a lot of groupthink involved in the way several people describe political systems. For instance, there’s a strong tendency for certain people, journalists especially, to “count countries.” With relatively few exceptions (especially those which have to do with specific international institutions like the United Nations or the “G20”) the number of countries involved in an event only has superficial significance. Demographic discrepancies between these national entities, not tio mention a certain degree of diversity in their social structures or even government apparatus, makes “counting countries” appear quite misleading, especially when the issue has to do with, say, social dynamics or geography. It sounds at times like people have a vague “political map of the World” in their heads and that this image preempts other approaches to global diversity. This may sound like a defensive stance on my part, as I try to position myself as “perhaps crazy but not more than others are.” But the issue goes deeper. In fact, it seems that “countries” are so ingrained  in some people’s minds and political borders are so obvious that local and regional issues are perceived as micro-version of what happens at the “national level.” This image doesn’t seem so strange when we talk about partisan politics but it appears quite inappropriate when we talk about a broad range of other subjects, from epidemiology to climate change, from online communication to geology, from language to religion.

An initial spark in my thinking about several of these issues came during Beverly Stoeltje‘s interdisciplinary Ph.D. seminar on nationalism at Indiana University Bloomington, back in 2000. Not only was this seminar edifying on many levels, but it represented a kind of epiphany moment in my reflections on not only nationalism itself (with related issues of patriotism, colonialism, and citizenship) but on a range of social issues and changes.

My initial “realization” was on the significance of the shift from Groulx-style French-Canadian nationalism to what Lévesque called «souveraineté-association» (“sovereignty-association”) and which served as the basis for the Quebec sovereignty movement.

While this all connects to well-known issues in political science and while it may (again) sound exceedingly naïve, I mean it in a very specific way which, I think, many people who discuss Quebec’s political history may rarely visit. As with other shifts about which I think, I don’t envision the one from French-Canadian nationalism (FCN) to Quebec sovereignty movement (QSM) to be radical or complete. But it was significant and broad-reaching.

Regardless of Lévesque’s personal view on nationalism (a relatively recent television series on his life had it that he became anti-nationalist after a visit to concentration camps), the very idea that there may exist a social movement oriented toward sovereignty outside of the nationalist logic seems quite important to me personally. The fact that this movement may only be represented in partisan politics as nationalism complicates the issue and may explain a certain confusion in terms of the range of Quebec’s current social movements. In other words, the fact that anti-nationalists are consistently lumped together with nationalists in the public (and journalistic) eye makes it difficult to discuss post-nationalism in this part of the Globe.

But Quebec’s history is only central to my thinking because I was born and Montreal and grew up through the Quiet Revolution. My reflections on a post-national shift are hopefully broader than historical events in a tiny part of the Globe.

In fact, my initial attempt at drafting this blogpost came after I attended a talk by Satoshi Ikeda entitled The Global Financial Crisis and the End of Neoliberalism. (November 27, 2008, Concordia University, SGW H-1125-12; found thanks to Twistory). My main idea at this point was that part of the solution to global problems were local.

But I was also thinking about The Internet.

Contrary to what technological determinists tend to say, the ‘Net isn’t changing things as much as it is part of a broad set of changes. In other words, the global communication network we now know as the Internet is embedded in historical contexts, not the ultimate cause of History. At the risk of replacing technological determinism with social determinism, one might point out that the ‘Net existed (both technologically and institutionally) long before its use became widespread. Those of us who observed a large influx of people online during the early to mid-1990s might even think that social changes were more significant in making the ‘Net what it is today than any “immanent” feature of the network as it was in, say, 1991.

Still, my thinking about the ‘Net has to do with the post-national shift. The ‘Net won’t cause the shift to new social and political structures. But it’s likely to “play a part” in that shift, to be prominently places as we move into a post-national reality.

There’s a number of practical and legal issues with a wide range of online activities which make it clear that the ‘Net fits more in a global structure than in an “international” one. Examples I have in mind include issues of copyright, broadcast rights, “national content,” and access to information, not to mention the online setting for some grassroots movements and the notion of “Internet citizenry.” In all of these cases, “Globalization” expands much beyond trade and currency-based economy.

Then, there’s the notion of “glocalization.” Every time I use the term “glocal,” I point out how “ugly” it is. The term hasn’t gained any currency (AFAICT) but I keep thinking that the concept can generate something interesting. What I personally have in mind is a movement away from national structures into both a globally connected world and a more local significance. The whole “Think Local, Act Global” idea (which I mostly encountered as “Think Global, Drink Local” as a motto). “Despite” the ‘Net, location still matters. But many people are also global-looking.

All of this is part of the setup for some of my reflections on a GNoCS. A kind of prelude/prologue. While my basic idea is very much a “pie in the sky,” I do have more precise notions about what the future may look like and the conditions in which some social changes might happen. At this point, I realize that these thoughts will be part of future blogposts, including some which might be closer to science-fiction than to this type semi- (or pseudo-) scholarly rambling.

But I might still flesh out a few notes.

Demographically, cities may matter more now than ever as the majority of the Globe’s population is urban. At least, the continued urbanization trend may fit well with a city-focused post-national model.

Some metropolitan areas have become so large as to connect with one another, constituting a kind of urban continuum. Contrary to boundaries between “nation-states,” divisions between cities can be quite blurry. In fact, a same location can be connected to dispersed centres of activity and people living in the same place can participate in more than one local sphere. Rotterdam-Amsterdam, Tokyo-Kyoto, Boston-NYC…

Somewhat counterintuitvely, urban areas tend to work relatively as the source of solutions to problems in the natural environment. For instance, some mayors have taken a lead in terms of environmental initiatives, not waiting for their national governments. And such issues as public transportations represent core competencies for municipal governments.

While transborder political entities like the European Union (EU), the African Union (AU), and the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are enmeshed in the national logic, they fit well with notions of globalized decentralization. As the mayor of a small Swiss town was saying on the event of Switzerland’s official 700th anniversary, we can think about «l’Europe des régions» (“Europe of regions”), beyond national borders.

Speaking of Switzerland, the confederacy/confederation model fits rather well with a network structure, perhaps more than with the idea of a “nation-state.” It also seems to go well with some forms of participatory democracy (as opposed to representative democracy). Not to mean that Switzerland or any other confederation/confederacy works as a participatory democracy. But these notions can help situate this GNoCS.

While relatively rare and unimportant “on the World Stage,” micro-states and micro-nations represent interesting cases in view of post-nationalist entities. For one thing, they may help dispel the belief that any political apart from the “nation-state” is a “reversal” to feudalism or even (Greek) Antiquity. The very existence of those entities which are “the exceptions to the rule” make it possible to “think outside of the national box.”

Demographically at the opposite end of the spectrum from microstates and micronations, the notion of a China-India union (or even a collaboration between China, India, Brazil, and Russia) may sound crazy in the current state of national politics but it would go well with a restructuring of the Globe, especially if this “New World Order” goes beyond currency-based trade.

Speaking of currency, the notion of the International Monetary Fund having its own currency is quite striking as a sign of a major shift from the “nation-state” logic. Of course, the IMF is embedded in “national” structures, but it can shift the focus away from “individual countries.”

The very notion of “democracy” has been on many lips, over the years. Now may be the time to pay more than lipservice to a notion of “Global Democracy,” which would transcend national boundaries (and give equal rights to all people across the Globe). Chances are that representative democracy may still dominate but a network structure connecting a large number of localized entities can also fit in other systems including participatory democracy, consensus culture, republicanism, and even the models of relatively egalitarian systems that some cultural anthropologists have been constructing over the years.

I still have all sorts of notes about examples and issues related to this notion of a GNoCS. But that will do for now.


Langue de bois et ethnographie

J’ai récemment eu l’occasion de penser à ce qu’on appelle la «langue de bois». D’ailleurs, cette expression me motive à écrire ce billet en français. Je sais pas exactement comment dire la même chose en anglais, même si le concept est évidemment connu des Anglophones.

Ce qui m’a poussé à penser à la «langue de bois», c’est cette entrevue, réalisée par Jesse Brown de la baladodiffusion Search Engine de Radio-Canada anglais (CBC) avec un porte-parole de Telus:

Search Engine | CBC Radio | Podcast #16 is up .

D’après moi, cette entrevue est assez représentative de la «langue de bois». Telus fait un geste intéressant, en permettant à un de ses représentants de parler «ouvertement» dans le cadre d’une baladodiffusion. Mais le contenu et le ton de cette entrevue révèlent ce qui est, selon moi, un problème fondamental de certaines entreprises en ce qui a trait aux «relations publiques». Plutôt que d’admettre qu’il y a une différence d’opinion entre Telus (ou Bell) et les utilisateurs de messagerie sur cellulaire, ce porte-parole utilise une rhétorique que je considère tortueuse pour convaincre les auditeurs (et l’intervieweur) du bien-fondé des actions de son entreprise.

C’est, selon moi, une stratégie peu appropriée au domaine actuel. Ça ressemble étrangement à la politique de l’autruche et ça n’aide en rien au rétablissement de liens de confiances entre Telus et le public.

Je suis rarement aussi direct, dans mes propos au sujet d’une stratégie. En fait, mes propos sont probablement plus «forts» que ce que je crois vraiment. Outre la frustration par rapport au coût prohibitif des messages entrants sur Bell Mobilité (qui m’a poussé à cesser d’utiliser un cellulaire de Bell), je n’ai que peu d’intérêt réel pour la question précise des rapports entre Telus et ses clients. Mais j’accorde davantage d’importance aux relations publiques, intéressé comme je suis en ce qui a trait à la recherche auprès des consommateurs (“consumer research”).

C’est que je suis en pleine réorientation professionnelle. J’ai récemment obtenu un contrat auprès de la firme Idea Couture de Toronto en tant qu’«ethnographe francophone autonome» (“French-speaking freelance ethnographer”). Pour ce contrat, je fais affaire avec Morgan Gerard qui, en plus d’être ethnographe, est aussi blogueur. J’intègre désormais certaines de mes activités de média social avec mon expertise en tant qu’ethnographe. Je souhaite d’ailleurs renforcer ce lien et éventuellement obtenir divers contrats en tant qu’ethnographe spécialisé en média social. Ce premier contrat d’ethnographe autonome n’est pas directement lié au média social et la principale méthode de recherche utilisée est basée sur des visites à domicile, auprès de familles québécoises diverses. J’aimerais effectuer d’autres recherches du même type dans le futur mais je vois aussi certaines extensions plus près du média social.

En préparation à ce travail contractuel, je me suis lancé dans la lecture de certains textes liés à l’utilisation de l’anthropologie et/ou de l’ethnographie dans le contexte des études de marché ou autres sphères d’activités du domaine privé. C’est un peu une façon pour moi de me «baigner» dans l’anthropologie et l’ethnographie appliquées, de réellement devenir ce type de chercheur, d’«assumer mon statut» d’ethnographe autonome.

Un livre qui m’a été conseillé, et que j’ai lu dernièrement, est Doing Anthropology in Consumer Research, de Sunderland et Denny. Je crois que l’aspect ethnolinguistique de cet ouvrage est ce qui a plu à John McCreery puisqu’il est, tout comme moi, actif dans l’étude ethnographique du langage. D’ailleurs, plusieurs dimensions de Doing Anthropology ont titillé non seulement mon sens de l’anthropologie linguistique mais aussi mon sens de la sémiotique. Ces chercheuses utilisent une approche très compatible avec la mienne puisqu’elle joint l’ethnographie à l’étude de la signifiance. McCreery aurait difficilement pu mieux tomber.

Ce livre me donne aussi un avant-goût des questions débattues par les ethnographes du domaine privé. Je perçois entre autres un sentiment d’incompréhension, de la part des ethnographes du milieu académique. Et un certain embarras face aux questions épineuses touchant à l’identité sociale, voire à la notion d’ethnicité. D’un point de vue ethnographique large, j’ai reconnu dans ce texte des sujets importants de l’ethnographie contemporaine. Au-delà de mon travail pour Idea Couture, j’ai trouvé des pistes pour m’aider à expliquer l’ethnographie à des gens d’autres sphères d’activité.

Et, pour terminer par un retour sur la «langue de bois» de Telus, j’y ai lu des choses très intéressantes au sujet de politiques inefficaces de relations publiques qui, tout comme ce porte-parole de Telus, se concentrent sur une rhétorique hermétique plutôt que de faire preuve de transparence et d’humilité.

Je reviendrai certainement à tout ça très bientôt.


Transparency and Secrecy

[Started working on this post on December 1st, based on something which happened a few days prior. Since then, several things happened which also connected to this post. Thought the timing was right to revisit the entry and finally publish it. Especially since a friend just teased me for not blogging in a while.]

I’m such a strong advocate of transparency that I have a real problem with secrecy.

I know, transparency is not exactly the mirror opposite of secrecy. But I think my transparency-radical perspective causes some problem in terms of secrecy-management.

“Haven’t you been working with a secret society in Mali?,” you ask. Well, yes, I have. And secrecy hasn’t been a problem in that context because it’s codified. Instead of a notion of “absolute secrecy,” the Malian donsow I’ve been working with have a subtle, nuanced, complex, layered, contextually realistic, elaborate, and fascinating perspective on how knowledge is processed, “transmitted,” managed. In fact, my dissertation research had a lot to do with this form of knowledge management. The term “knowledge people” (“karamoko,” from kalan+mogo=learning+people) truly applies to members of hunter’s associations in Mali as well as to other local experts. These people make a clear difference between knowledge and information. And I can readily relate to their approach. Maybe I’ve “gone native,” but it’s more likely that I was already in that mode before I ever went to Mali (almost 11 years ago).

Of course, a high value for transparency is a hallmark of academia. The notion that “information wants to be free” makes more sense from an academic perspective than from one focused on a currency-based economy. Even when people are clear that “free” stands for “freedom”/«libre» and not for “gratis”/«gratuit» (i.e. “free as in speech, not free as in beer”), there persists a notion that “free comes at a cost” among those people who are so focused on growth and profit. IMHO, most the issues with the switch to “immaterial economies” (“information economy,” “attention economy,” “digital economy”) have to do with this clash between the value of knowledge and a strict sense of “property value.”

But I digress.

Or, do I…?

The phrase “radical transparency” has been used in business circles related to “information and communication technology,” a context in which the “information wants to be free” stance is almost the basis of a movement.

I’m probably more naïve than most people I have met in Mali. While there, a friend told me that he thought that people from the United States were naïve. While he wasn’t referring to me, I can easily acknowledge that the naïveté he described is probably characteristic of my own attitude. I’m North American enough to accept this.

My dedication to transparency was tested by an apparently banal set of circumstances, a few days before I drafted this post. I was given, in public, information which could potentially be harmful if revealed to a certain person. The harm which could be done is relatively small. The person who gave me that information wasn’t overstating it. The effects of my sharing this information wouldn’t be tragic. But I was torn between my radical transparency stance and my desire to do as little harm as humanly possible. So I refrained from sharing this information and decided to write this post instead.

And this post has been sitting in my “draft box” for a while. I wrote a good number of entries in the meantime but I still had this one at the back of my mind. On the backburner. This is where social media becomes something more of a way of life than an activity. Even when I don’t do anything on this blog, I think about it quite a bit.

As mentioned in the preamble, a number of things have happened since I drafted this post which also relate to transparency and secrecy. Including both professional and personal occurrences. Some of these comfort me in my radical transparency position while others help me manage secrecy in a thoughtful way.

On the professional front, first. I’ve recently signed a freelance ethnography contract with Toronto-based consultancy firm Idea Couture. The contract included a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). Even before signing the contract/NDA, I was asking fellow ethnographer and blogger Morgan Gerard about disclosure. Thanks to him, I now know that I can already disclose several things about this contract and that, once the results are public, I’ll be able to talk about this freely. Which all comforts me on a very deep level. This is precisely the kind of information and knowledge management I can relate to. The level of secrecy is easily understandable (inopportune disclosure could be detrimental to the client). My commitment to transparency is unwavering. If all contracts are like this, I’ll be quite happy to be a freelance ethnographer. It may not be my only job (I already know that I’ll be teaching online, again). But it already fits in my personal approach to information, knowledge, insight.

I’ll surely blog about private-sector ethnography. At this point, I’ve mostly been preparing through reading material in the field and discussing things with friends or colleagues. I was probably even more careful than I needed to be, but I was still able to exchange ideas about market research ethnography with people in diverse fields. I sincerely think that these exchanges not only add value to my current work for Idea Couture but position me quite well for the future. I really am preparing for freelance ethnography. I’m already thinking like a freelance ethnographer.

There’s a surprising degree of “cohesiveness” in my life, these days. Or, at least, I perceive my life as “making sense.”

And different things have made me say that 2009 would be my year. I get additional evidence of this on a regular basis.

Which brings me to personal issues, still about transparency and secrecy.

Something has happened in my personal life, recently, that I’m currently unable to share. It’s a happy circumstance and I’ll be sharing it later, but it’s semi-secret for now.

Thing is, though, transparency was involved in that my dedication to radical transparency has already been paying off in these personal respects. More specifically, my being transparent has been valued rather highly and there’s something about this type of validation which touches me deeply.

As can probably be noticed, I’m also becoming more public about some emotional dimensions of my life. As an artist and a humanist, I’ve always been a sensitive person, in-tune with his emotions. Specially positive ones. I now feel accepted as a sensitive person, even if several people in my life tend to push sensitivity to the side. In other words, I’ve grown a lot in the past several months and I now want to share my growth with others. Despite reluctance toward the “touchy-feely,” specially in geek and other male-centric circles, I’ve decided to “let it all loose.” I fully respect those who dislike this. But I need to be myself.


Gender and Culture

A friend sent me a link to the following video:

JC Penney: Beware of the Doghouse | Creativity Online.

In that video, a man is “sent to the doghouse” (a kind of prison for insensitive men) because he offered a vacuum cleaner to his wife. It’s part of a marketing campaign through which men are expected to buy diamonds to their wives and girlfriends.

The campaign is quite elaborate and the main website for the campaign makes interesting uses of social media.

For instance, that site makes use of Facebook Connect as a way to tap viewers’ online social network. FC is a relatively new feature (the general release was last week) and few sites have been putting it to the test. In this campaign’s case, a woman can use her Facebook account to connect to her husband or boyfriend and either send him a warning about his insensitivity to her needs (of diamonds) or “put him in the doghouse.” From a social media perspective, it can accurately be described as “neat.”

The site also uses Share This to facilitate the video‘s diffusion  through various social media services, from WordPress.com to Diigo. This tends to be an effective strategy to encourage “viral marketing.” (And, yes, I fully realize that I actively contribute to this campaign’s “viral spread.”)

The campaign could be a case study in social marketing.

But, this time, I’m mostly thinking about gender.

Simply put, I think that this campaign would fare rather badly in Quebec because of its use of culturally inappropriate gender stereotypes.

As I write this post, I receive feedback from Swedish ethnomusicologist Maria Ljungdahl who shares some insight about gender stereotypes. As Maria says, the stereotypes in this ad are “global.” But my sense is that these “global stereotypes” are not that compatible with local culture, at least among Québécois (French-speaking Quebeckers).

See, as a Québécois born and raised as a (male) feminist, I tend to be quite gender-conscious. I might even say that my gender awareness may be somewhat above the Québécois average and gender relationships are frequently used in definitions of Québécois identity.

In Québécois media, advertising campaigns portraying men as naïve and subservient have frequently been discussed. Ten or so years ago, these portrayals were a hot topic (searches for Brault & Martineau, Tim Hortons, and Un gars, une fille should eventually lead to appropriate evidence). Current advertising campaigns seem to me more subtle in terms of male figures, but careful analysis would be warranted as discussions of those portrayals are more infrequent than they have been in the past.

That video and campaign are, to me, very US-specific. Because I spent a significant amount of time in Indiana, Massachusetts, and Texas, my initial reaction while watching the video had more to do with being glad that it wasn’t the typical macrobrewery-style sexist ad. This reaction also has to do with the context for my watching that video as I was unclear as to the gender perspective of the friend who sent me the link (a male homebrewer from the MidWest currently living in Texas).

By the end of the video, however, I reverted to my Québécois sensibility. I also reacted to the obvious commercialism, partly because one of my students has been working on engagement rings in our material culture course.

But my main issue was with the presumed insensitivity of men.

Granted, part of this is personal. I define myself as a “sweet and tendre man” and I’m quite happy about my degree of sensitivity, which may in fact be slightly higher than average, even among Québécois. But my hunch is that this presumption of male insensitivity may not have very positive effects on the perception of such a campaign. Québécois watching this video may not groan but they may not find it that funny either.

There’s a generational component involved and, partly because of a discussion of writing styles in a generational perspective, I have been thinking about “generations” as a useful model for explaining cultural diversity to non-ethnographers.

See, such perceived generational groups as “Baby Boomers” and “Generation X” need not be defined as monolithic, monadic, bounded entities and they have none of the problems associated with notions of “ethnicity” in the general public. “Generations” aren’t “faraway tribes” nor do they imply complete isolation. Some people may tend to use “generational” labels in such terms that they appear clearly defined (“Baby Boomers are those individuals born between such and such years”). And there is some confusion between this use of “historical generations” and what the concept of “generation” means in, say, the study of kinship systems. But it’s still relatively easy to get people to think about generations in cultural terms: they’re not “different cultures” but they still seem to be “culturally different.”

Going back to gender… The JC Penney marketing campaign visibly lumps together people of different ages. The notion seems to be that doghouse-worthy male insensitivity isn’t age-specific or related to inexperience. The one man who was able to leave the doghouse based on his purchase of diamonds is relatively “age-neutral” as he doesn’t really seem to represent a given age. Because this attempt at crossing age divisions seems so obvious, I would assume that it came in the context of perceived differences in gender relationships. Using the logic of those who perceive the second part of the 20th Century as a period of social emancipation, one might presume that younger men are less insensitive than older men (who were “brought up” in a cultural context which was “still sexist”). If there are wide differences in the degree of sensitivity of men of different ages, a campaign aiming at a broad age range needs to diminish the importance of these differences. “The joke needs to be funny to men of all ages.”

The Quebec context is, I think, different. While we do perceive the second part of the 20th Century (and, especially, the 1970s) as a period of social emancipation (known as the “Quiet Revolution” or «Révolution Tranquille»), the degree of sensitivity to gender issues appears to be relatively level, across the population. At a certain point in time, one might have argued that older men were still insensitive (at the same time as divorcées in their forties might have been regarded as very assertive) but it seems difficult to make such a distinction in the current context.

All this to say that the JC Penney commercial is culturally inappropriate for Québécois society? Not quite. Though the example I used was this JC Penney campaign, I’m thinking about broader contexts for Québécois identity (for a variety of personal reasons, including the fact that I have been back in Québec for several months, now).

My claim is…

Ethnographic field research would go a long way to unearth culturally appropriate categories which might eventually help marketers cater to Québécois.

Of course, the agency which produced that JC Penney ad (Saatchi & Saatchi) was targeting the US market (JC Penney doesn’t have locations in Quebec) and I received the link through a friend in the US. But it was an interesting opportunity for me to think and write about a few issues related to the cultural specificity of gender stereotypes.


La Renaissance du café à Montréal

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la dernière section de ce long billet. Il consiste en une espèce de résumé de la situation actuelle de la scène montréalaise du café, avec un regard porté vers son avenir. Vous pouvez consulter l’introduction qui contient des liens aux autres sections et ainsi avoir un contexte plus large.

À mon humble avis, l’arrivée de la Troisième vague à Montréal nous permet maintenant d’explorer le café dans toute sa splendeur. En quelque sorte, c’était la pièce qui manquait au casse-tête.

Dans mon précédent billet, j’ai omis de comparer le café à l’italienne au café à la québécoise (outre l’importance de l’allongé). C’est en partie parce que les différences sont un peu difficile à expliquer. Mais disons qu’il y a une certaine diversité de saveurs, à travers la dimension «à la québécoise» de la scène montréalaise du café. Malgré certains points communs, les divers cafés de Montréalais n’ont jamais été d’une très grande homogénéité, au niveau du goût. Les ressemblances venaient surtout de l’utilisation des quelques maisons de torréfaction locales plutôt que d’une unité conceptuelle sur la façon de faire le café. D’ailleurs, j’ai souvent perçu qu’il y avait eu une baisse de diversité dans les goûts proposés par différents cafés montréalais au cours des quinze dernières années, et je considère ce processus de quasi-standardisation (qui n’a jamais été menée à terme) comme un aspect néfaste de cette période dans l’histoire du café à Montréal. Les nouveaux développements de la scène montréalaise du café me donne espoir que la diversité de cette scène grandit de nouveau après cette période de «consolidation».

D’ailleurs, c’est non sans fierté que je pense au fait que les grandes chaînes «étrangères» de cafés ont eu de la difficulté à s’implanter à Montréal. Si Montréal n’a eu sa première succursale Starbucks qu’après plusieurs autres villes nord-américaines et si Second Cup a rapidement dû fermer une de ses succursales montréalaises, c’est entre autres parce que la scène montréalaise du café était très vivante, bien avant l’arrivée des chaînes. D’ailleurs, plusieurs chaînes se sont développé localement avant de se disperser à l’extérieur de Montréal. Le résultat est qu’il y a probablement, à l’heure actuelle, autant sinon plus de succursales de chaînes de cafés à Montréal que dans n’importe autre grande ville, mais qu’une proportion significative de ces cafés est originaire de Montréal. Si l’existence de chaînes locales de cafés n’a aucune corrélation avec la qualité moyenne du café qu’on dans une région donnée (j’ai même tendance à croire qu’il y a une corrélation inverse entre le nombre de chaînes et la qualité moyenne du café), la «conception montréalaise» du café me semble révêlée par les difficultés rencontrées par les chaînes extrogènes.

En fait, une caractéristique de la scène du café à Montréal est que la diversité est liée à la diversité de la population. Non seulement la diversité linguistique, culturelle, ethnique et sociale. Mais la diversité en terme de goûts et de perspectives. La diversité humaine à Montréal évoque l’image de la «salade mixte»: un mélange harmonieux mais avec des éléments qui demeurent distincts. D’aucuns diront que c’est le propre de toute grande ville, d’être intégrée de la sorte. D’autres diront que Montréal est moins bien intégrée que telle ou telle autre grande ville. Mais le portrait que j’essaie de brosser n’est ni plus beau, ni plus original que celui d’une autre ville. Il est simplement typique.

Outre les cafés «à la québécoise», «à l’italienne» et «troisième vague» que j’ai décrits, Montréal dispose de plusieurs cafés qui sont liés à diverses communautés. Oui, je pense à des cafés liés à des communautés culturelles, comme un café guatémaltèque ou un café libanais. Mais aussi à des cafés liés à des groupes sociaux particuliers ou à des communautés religieuses. Au point de vue du goût, le café servi à ces divers endroits n’est peut-être pas si distinctif. Mais l’expérience du café prend un sens spécifique à chacun de ces endroits.

Et si j’ai parlé presqu’exclusivement de commerces liés au café, je pense beaucoup à la dimension disons «domestique» du café.

Selon moi, la population de la région montréalaise a le potentiel d’un réel engouement pour le café de qualité. Même s’ils n’ont pas toujours une connaissance très approfondie du café et même s’il consomme du café de moins bonne qualité, plusieurs Montréalais semblent très intéressés par le café. Certains d’entre eux croient connaître le café au point de ne pas vouloir en découvrir d’autres aspects. Mais les discussions sur le goût du café sont monnaie courante parmi des gens de divers milieux, ne serait-ce que dans le choix de certains cafés.

Évidemment, ces discussions ont lieu ailleurs et le café m’a souvent aidé à m’intégrer à des réseaux sociaux de villes où j’ai habité. Mais ce que je crois être assez particulier à Montréal, c’est qu’il ne semble pas y avoir une «idéologie dominante» du café. Certains amateurs de café (et certains professionnels du café) sont très dogmatiques, voire doctrinaires. Mais je ne perçois aucune  idée sur le café qui serait réellement acquise par tous. Il y a des Tim Hortons et des Starbucks à Montréal mais, contrairement à d’autres coins du continent, il ne semble pas y avoir un café qui fait consensus.

Par contre, il y a une sorte de petite oligarchie. Quelques maisons de torréfaction et de distribution du café semblent avoir une bonne part du marché. Je pense surtout à Union, Brossard et Van Houtte (qui a aussi une chaîne de café et qui était pris à une certaine époque comme exemple de succès financier). À ce que je sache, ces trois entreprises sont locales. À l’échelle globale, l’oligarchie du monde du café est constituée par Nestlé, Sara Lee, Kraft et Proctor & Gamble. J’imagine facilement que ces multinationales ont autant de succès à Montréal qu’ailleurs dans le monde mais je trouve intéressant de penser au poids relatif de quelques chaînes locales.

Parlant de chaînes locales, je crois que certaines entreprises locales peuvent avoir un rôle déterminant dans la «Renaissance du café à Montréal». Je pense surtout à Café Terra de Carlo Granito, à Café Mystique et Toi, Moi & Café de Sevan Istanboulian, à Café Rico de Sévanne Kordahi et à la coop La Maison verte à Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. Ces choix peuvent sembler par trop personnels, voire arbitraires. Mais chaque élément me semble représentatif de la scène montréalaise du café. Carlo Granito, par exemple, a participé récemment à l’émission Samedi et rien d’autre de Radio-Canada, en compagnie de Philippe Mollé (audio de 14:30 à 32:30). Sevan Istanboulian est juge certifié du World Barista Championship et distribue ses cafés à des endroits stratégiques. Sévanne Kordahi a su concentrer ses activités dans des domaines spécifiques et ses cafés sont fort appréciés par des groupes d’étudiants (entre autres grâce à un rabais étudiant). Puis j’ai appris dernièrement que La Maison verte servait du Café Femenino qui met de l’avant une des plus importantes dimensions éthiques du monde du café.

Pour revenir au «commun des mortels», l’amateur de café. Au-delà de la spécificité locale, je crois qu’une scène du café se bâtit par une dynamique entre individus, une série de «petites choses qui finissent par faire une différence». Et c’est cette dynamique qui me rend confiant.

La communauté des enthousiastes du café à Montréal est somme toute assez petite mais bien vivante. Et je me place dans les rangs de cette communauté.

Certains d’entre nous avons participé à divers événements ensemble, comme des dégustations et des séances de préparation de café. Les discussions à propos du café se multiplient, entre nous. D’ailleurs, nous nous croisons assez régulièrement, dans l’un ou l’autre des hauts lieux du café à Montréal. D’ailleurs, d’autres dimensions du monde culinaire sont représentés parmi nous, depuis la bière artisanale au végétalianisme en passant par le chocolat et le thé. Ces liens peuvent sembler évident mais c’est surtout parce que chacun d’entre nous fait partie de différents réseaux que la communauté me semble riche. En discutant ensemble, nous en venons à parler de plusieurs autres arts culinaires au-delà du café, ce qui renforce les liens entre le café et le reste du monde culinaire. En parlant de café avec nos autres amis, nous créons un effet de vague, puisque nous participons à des milieux distincts. C’est d’ailleurs une représentation assez efficace de ce que je continue d’appeler «l’effet du papillon social»: le battement de ses ailes se répercute dans divers environnements. Si la friction n’est pas trop grande, l’onde de choc provenant de notre communauté risque de se faire sentir dans l’ensemble de la scène du café à Montréal.

Pour boucler la boucle (avant d’aller me coucher), je dois souligner le fait que, depuis peu, le lieu de rencontre privilégié de notre petit groupe d’enthousiastes est le Café Myriade.


Café «troisième vague» et café «à l’italienne»

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la quatrième section après l’introduction et des sections sur divers types de cafés à Montréal: «à l’talienne», «à la québécoise» et «troisième vague».) Cette section est une tentative d’explication de la «Troisième vague» par contraste avec le «café à l’italienne», sans référence particulière à Montréal.

En tant que phase dans l’histoire du café, la «Troisième vague» (“Third Wave”) est basée sur une philosophie du respect, une forme d’humanisme. Sans être nécessairement alter-mondialistes, les partisans du Third Wave ont à cœur le sort de tous ceux qui œuvrent dans le domaine du café, quel que soit leur statut. Étant données les grandes inégalités entre producteurs et consommateurs de café, le sens de justice des “third wavers” est surtout tourné vers l’amélioration des conditions de travail liées à la production du café dans des régions défavorisées du Globe (la «Périphérie» de Wallerstein). C’est un peu les mêmes «bonnes intentions» qui ont permis aux «cafés équitables» de capturer l’imagination de plusieurs Européens et Nord-Américains. Mais la Troisième vague va beaucoup plus loin dans la direction du respect humain. Il ne s’agit désormais plus de fixer un prix plancher et quelques normes de travail, au sein de comités formés pour la plus grande part d’étrangers à la production du café. Il s’agit, en fait, de transformer le café en un produit culinaire sophistiqué «au même titre que le vin».

L’imaginaire du vin revient souvent dans ce contexte. On parle par exemple de «domaine» (“estate”) au même sens que pour le vin. La notion d’«origine» (par exemple dans “single origin”) correspond plus ou moins à celle de «terroir» (mais avec certaines résonances au niveau du «cépage»). Les mélanges de café, généralement conçus par les torréfacteurs, ressemblent un peu aux «assemblages» en contexte œnologique. La dégustation du café s’inspire parfois de celle du vin et le rôle du barista ressemble parfois à celui du sommelier.

Comme pour le vin, l’idée de base est de mettre en valeur les qualités intrinsèques du produit de base (le raisin ou le grain de café). Dans plusieurs cas, le café provenant d’un lot spécifique d’un domaine particulier est utilisé seul, même en espresso.

De prestigieuses ventes aux enchères (Cup of Excellence) sont organisées à chaque année pour des lots de café sélectionnés lors de compétitions nationales et certains de ces cafés obtiennent des montants extraordinaires. Ces montants étant directement versés aux propriétaires du domaine ayant cultivé ces cafés, certaines plantations de café dont certains produits ont su répondre aux exigences d’acheteurs de café obtiennent des montants élevés pour une part de leur production et leurs statuts ressemblent de plus en plus à celui de grands vignobles.

Au-delà de ces enchères annuelles, les partisans de la troisième vague tiennent à raccourcir la chaîne qui va de la production des grains de café à la dégustation du café. Ainsi, plusieurs torréfacteurs (y compris certains dont le café n’est pas distribué à large échelle) entretiennent des rapports directs avec les producteurs de café. Le voyage vers une région où le café est cultivé (“trip to origin”) est presque considéré comme un rite de passage, par les Third Wavers. Un peu comme dans les produits maraîchers et de boucherie, la ferme à l’origine de chaque produit d’alimentation peut être retracée avec précision. L’idée du rapport humain est donc mise de l’avant.

Chaque café de la troisième vague est donc tourné vers la compréhension du café. Même dans des chaînes de cafés assez étendues, cette notion de comprendre le café dans son moindre détail est transmis à chaque employé. Puisque plusieurs employés de cafés sont de jeunes étudiants et qu’il y a beaucoup de roulement dans ce milieu, le «message» est transmis à de nombreuses personnes et la troisième vague déferle dans diverses villes.

Dans une certaine mesure, il y a une «façon troisième vague» de faire le café. Pas qu’il s’agisse d’une méthode vraiment standardisée, mais il y a divers facteurs dans l’art du café qui sont influencés par la Troisième vague, surtout dans le cas de l’espresso.

Le facteur le plus évident: la fraîcheur. Si la fraîcheur a une grande valeur pour presque tout style de café, elle est devenue une véritable obsession au sein de la Troisième vague. Et ce, à presque toutes les étapes. Une fois séchés et triés, les grains de café vert se conservent assez longtemps. Après avoir été torréfiés, par contre, les grains de café ne conservent leurs arômes que s’ils ne sont pas attaqués par l’oxygène. Au cours des sept à dix premiers jours après la torréfaction, du gaz carbonique s’échappe des grains de café, empêchant l’oxygène de pénétrer dans les grains. Après quelques jours, les grains de café cessent d’expulser du gaz carbonique et deviennent extrêmement sensibles à l’oxydation. Les opinions divergent et les estimés varient mais, selon certains partisans de la troisième vague, la majorité des arômes de certains cafés semble disparaître en dix jours après la torréfaction (malheureusement, je n’arrive pas à trouver de référence à ce sujet mais cette notion est souvent discutée). Selon certains, aucune méthode de stockage ne réussit réellement à conserver la fraîcheur du café au-delà de quelques jours. Les torréfacteurs de la troisième vague indiquent donc la date de torréfaction sur leurs paquets de café et s’assurent que leurs cafés sont distribués très rapidement. Les torréfacteurs italiens, eux, peuvent entreposer leurs grains torréfiés pendant des semaines voire des mois avant qu’ils soient utilisés pour préparer du café.

Une fois moulu, le café se dégrade beaucoup plus rapidement que sous forme de grains. Une notion assez commune dans le milieu Third Wave est qu’il ne suffit que de quelques minutes pour que certains cafés perdent leurs arômes les plus fins. La méthode de préparation du café est donc basé sur la «mouture à la minute». Pour l’espresso, la quantité de café nécessaire à préparer deux cafés (en une seule fois, avec un bec double) est la quantité maximum de café qui peut être moulue à la fois. Le contraste avec les baristas italiens est frappant puisque ceux-ci préfèrent moudre une grande quantité de café, les doseurs de leurs moulins étant conçus pour distribuer environ 7 g de café moulu par compartiment lorsque tous les compartiments sont pleins. (J’ignore combien de compartiments ces doseurs comportent mais le simple fait que le café soit moulu à l’avance semble une hérésie pour les partisans de la troisième vague.)

L’arôme du café comporte de nombreux composés volatils et, surtout dans le cas de l’espresso, ces composés se dissipent très rapidement à l’air libre. Après avoir été «tiré», un espresso troisième vague doit donc être servi très rapidement. Aussi extrême que cela puisse paraître, un délai d’une minute peut faire une différence significative dans le cas de certains cafés. Les arômes les plus éphémères du café sont souvent ceux qui procurent une expérience plus intense et c’est parfois la sensation procurée par ces arômes qui fait du café troisième vague un objet d’admiration. Les autres méthodes de préparation du café sont généralement moins sensibles à l’effet du temps. Un «café piston» (fait avec une cafetière piston), par exemple, évolue pendant qu’il se refroidit et certains arômes ne se dégagent qu’après quelques minutes. Mais si toute méthode de préparation du café peut être utilisée par des partisans de la troisième vague, c’est l’espresso qui constitue, selon les third wavers, l’apogée du café.

L’espresso à l’italienne est servi et consommé assez rapidement. Mais les arômes qui s’en dégagent sont généralement plus durables que pour l’«ultime espresso troisième vague». En fait, l’espresso à l’italienne tire plusieurs de ses arômes de la torréfaction: rôti, chocolat, noix, grillé, fruits secs… Le café de la troisième vague possède souvent des arômes qui proviennent plus directement de la variété de grains de café: épices, bleuet, agrume, tomate, fraise, cerise, abricot…

Tous ces points de comparaison entre la troisième vague et le café à l’italienne sont liés au passage du temps. Il y a d’autres distinctions. Par exemple, l’espresso à l’italienne comporte souvent une certaine proportions de grains venant de l’espèce Coffea canephora de caféier: le «café robusta». Les cafés de cet arbuste sont très généralement considérés comme de bien moindre qualité que ceux du Coffea arabica (le «café arabica»). Le robusta, peu coûteux, est le café de la consommation de base, à l’échelle globale, et non celui de la dégustation respectueuse. Les torréfacteurs italiens utilisent un peu de robusta dans leurs mélanges, à la fois pour le maintien de la crema (l’émulsion au-dessus de l’espresso) que par goût pour une certaine amertume durable. Au cours de la Troisième vague, le statut du robusta a changé quelque peu mais la plupart des torréfacteurs se réclamant de ce mouvement parlent du robusta d’une façon assez négative. Outre les caractéristiques gustatives du café produit avec une proportion de grains robusta, la méthode habituelle de culture du Coffea canephora (procédés industriels, mauvaises conditions de travail, manque de contrôles de qualité…) va à l’encontre de l’esprit Third Wave. S’il existe des «bons robustas», cultivés avec autant de soin que pour l’arabica, les torréfacteurs de la Troisième vague ne tiennent pas à les connaître.

À cause des caractéristiques propres au café utilisé, l’espresso de troisième vague nécessite généralement un contrôle très précis de la température. Alors que les mélanges à espresso italien tolèrent des larges écarts de température sans changer trop de goût, certains cafés d’origine unique utilisé pour l’espresso troisième vague a un goût très différent s’il est réalisé à moins d’un demi-degré Celsius de sa température optimale. D’ailleurs, la Troisième vague est aussi une tendance à l’utilisation d’outils très précis et à une passion pour l’exactitude. En ce sens, la Troisième vague fait beaucoup penser à la culture geek qui, elle aussi, prend sa source dans une certaine portion de la Côte Ouest.

Autre aspect important de la préparation du café troisième vague, c’est un jeu très particulier sur la mouture et le dosage du café. En fait, beaucoup de baristas de la Troisième vague ont tendance à «surdoser» (“updose”) leurs portafiltres d’une proportion bien plus grande de café que ce que voudrait une norme italienne. La technique de dispersion du café moulu dans le portafiltre et l’«écrasement» (“tamping”) de ce café moulu à l’aide d’un instrument dédié (le “tamper”) font l’objet de multiples discussions et d’un apprentissage approfondi. A contrario, certains baristas italiens n’«écrasent» pas le café moulu dans le portafiltre.

Comme l’espresso italien est généralement doté d’une certaine amertume, l’ajout d’un peu de sucre à un espresso italien est relativement commun. Il existe des Italiens (et d’autres amateurs de café) qui voient d’un assez mauvais œil l’ajout de sucre dans l’espresso, mais le goût de l’espresso à l’italienne est souvent réhaussé par quelques grains de sucre. Sans être anti-sucre, la troisième vague est orientée tout entière vers «le café en soi». Un café doit, selon eux, pouvoir «parler de lui-même». Comme avec de nombreux thés de qualité, l’ajout de sucre à un café Third Wave (peu importe la méthode de préparation!) diminue certaines saveurs plutôt que de rehausser le goût du breuvage.

Bien entendu, la Troisième vague permet la préparation de breuvages à base de lait (“milk-based”) comme le Latte macchiato, le cappuccino et le caffè latte. D’ailleurs, l’ajout du lait à ces breuvages est souvent effectué sous forme de «dessins» basés sur le contraste entre la crema de l’espresso et le lait. Pour certains, ces dessins (le “latte art”) est même un facteur important permettant de reconnaître les baristas de la Troisième vague puisque, pour être réussis, ces dessins nécessitent un soin particulier, entre autre dans la créaction d’un lait «soyeux», plein de microbulles. Par contre, la tendance troisième vague est de diminuer le plus possible la proportion de lait dans ces breuvages. Dans ce contexte, la qualité d’un espresso est souvent perçue comme supérieure à celle d’un macchiato qui est perçue comme supérieure à celle du cappuccino. Le latte, bien que devenu très populaire, est parfois considéré comme un mal nécessaire et plusieurs baristas se gaussent des chaînes de cafés qui ont fait du latte un breuvage avec une très grande quantité de lait. En compétition de barista, un critère déterminant pour l’évaluation d’un cappuccino est que la saveur de l’espresso ne soit pas masquée, renforçant encore l’idée troisième vague de mettre le café à l’honneur. Il est commun, dans la Troisième vague, de parler de grains de café (mélange ou «origine unique») qui ne conviennent pas dans les breuvages avec lait. En général, le café à l’italienne s’agrémente très facilement de lait et, dans certains cas, ne prend son sens que dans un breuvage à base de lait.

J’ai mentionné plus haut une distinction entre arômes de torréfaction et arômes de variété. En général, plus plus le degré de torréfaction est élevé (plus les grains sont foncés), plus les arômes «variétaux» disparaissent, surtout en fonction de la pyrolise. Les cafés italiens sont en général d’une torréfaction très foncée et, dans certains cas, les arômes provenant de la variété de café disparaissent complètement. En général, le café troisième vague est donc plus complexe que le café à l’italienne du point de vue olfactif à cause de la torréfaction elle-même. Certains torréfacteurs de la Troisième vague sont même tellement obsédés par les torréfactions «légères» (plus pâles) que certains de leurs cafés ont des saveurs que plusieurs trouvent déplaisantes. Mais, en général, le café troisième vague est conçu pour être balancé, complexe et «propre».

C’est d’ailleurs une caractéristique fondamentale de l’esthétique Third Wave qui est présente dans les règles des championnats de baristas. Le goût de l’espresso doit être «balancé» en ce sens qu’aucun des trois goûts fondamentaux du café (sucré, amertume, acidité/”brightness”) ne peut être dominant mais qu’il doit y avoir une dynamique entre au moins deux de ces trois goûts. C’est un peu difficile à expliquer mais très facile à percevoir. Et un espresso extraordinairement bien balancé est une véritable œuvre d’art.


Café à la québécoise

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la troisième section après l’introduction et une section sur les cafés italiens de Montréal. Cette section se concentre sur une certaine spécificité québécoise de la scène montréalaise du café.

La scène du café à Montréal comporte plusieurs autres institutions qui ne correspondent pas vraiment à l’image du café italien. Certains de ces endroits peuvent même servir de base à la «Renaissance du café à Montréal».

Dans l’ensemble, je dirais que ces cafés sont typiquement québécois. Pas que ces cafés soient vraiment exclusifs au Québec mais il y a quelque-chose de reconnaissable dans ces cafés qui me fait penser au goût québécois pour le café.

Comme les intellos de Montréal ont longtemps eu tendance à s’identifier à la France, certains de ces cafés ont une tendance française, voire parisienne. Pas qu’on y sert des larges bols de “café au lait” (à base de café filtre) accompagnés de pain sec. Mais le breuvage de base ressemble plus au café français qu’au café italien.

D’après moi, la référence à la France a eu beaucoup d’influence sur la perception des cafés montréalais par des gens de l’extérieur. Pour une large part, cette référence était plutôt une question d’ambiance qu’une question de caractéristiques gustatives et olfactives précises. Dans un café montréalais, des Nord-Américains ayant passé du temps en France pouvaient se «rappeler l’Europe». La Rive-Gauche à l’Ouest de l’Atlantique.

Pour revenir au mode «mémoires», je pense tout d’abord à la Brûlerie Saint-Denis comme institution montréalaise de ce type. Vers la fin de mon adolescence, c’est par l’entremise de la compagne de mon frère (qui y travaillait) que j’ai connu la Brûlerie. À l’époque, il s’agissait d’un café isolé (au cœur du Plateau, qui n’était pas encore si «chromé») et non d’une chaîne avec des succursales dispersées. Ce dont je me rappelle est assez représentatif d’une certaine spécificité québécoise: un «allongé» de qualité.

L’allongé (ou «espresso allongé») n’est pas exclusif au Québec mais c’est peut-être le breuvage le plus représentatif d’un goût québécois pour le café.

En Amérique du Nord, hors du Québec, l’allongé a généralement mauvaise réputation. Selon plusieurs, il s’agit d’une surextraction de l’espresso. Avec la même quantité de café moulu que pour un espresso à l’italienne d’une once, on produit un café de deux onces ou plus en laissant l’eau passer dans le café. «Toute chose étant égale par ailleurs», une telle surextraction amène dans la tasse des goûts considérés peu agréables, comme une trop grande amertume, voire de l’astringence. En même temps, la quantité de liquide dans la tasse implique une dillution extrême et on s’attend à un café «aqueux», peu goûteux.

Pourtant, je me rappelle de multiples allongés, presque tous dégustés au Québec, qui étaient savoureux sans être astringents. Selon toute logique, ce doit être parce que la mouture du café et le mélange de grains de café ont été adaptés à la réalisation d’un allongé de qualité. Ce qui implique certaines choses pour l’«espresso serré» (ou «espresso court», donc non-allongé) s’il est réalisé avec la même mouture et le même mélange. Même à Montréal, il est rare d’avoir dans le même café un excellent espresso court et un excellent allongé.

Mais parmi les Montréalais amateurs de café, l’allongé «a la cote» et les cafés montréalais typiques font généralement un bon allongé.

Selon mon souvenir, l’allongé de la Brûlerie Saint-Denis était de qualité. J’ai eu de moins bonnes expériences à la Brûlerie depuis que l’entreprise a ouvert d’autres succursales, mais c’est peut-être un hasard.

Une autre institution de la scène montréalaise du café, situé sur le Plateau comme la Brûlerie Saint-Denis à l’origine, c’est le café Aux Deux Marie. Le Deux Marie aujourd’hui ressemble beaucoup à mon souvenir de la Brûlerie Saint-Denis. Comme à la Brûlerie, j’y ai bu des allongés de qualité. C’est au Deux Marie que j’ai découvert certains «breuvages de spécialité» (“specialty drinks”, comme les appelle le World Barista Championship). Ces breuvages, à base d’espresso, contiennent des fruits, des épices, du chocolat et d’autres ingrédients. Si je me rappelle bien, la Brûlerie fait le même genre de breuvage mais je ne me rappelle pas en avoir remarqué, il y a une vingtaine d’années.

Il y a plusieurs autres «cafés à la québécoise». Dans les institutions connues, il y a La Petite Ardoise (tout près d’Outremont, sur Laurier). C’est d’ailleurs mon premier lieu de travail puisque j’y ai été plongeur, à la fin du secondaire (1988-9). C’est un «café bistro terrasse» assez typique de la scène culinaire montréalaise. Le cappuccino et l’allongé étaient très populaires (si je me rappelle bien, on les appelait «capp» et «all», respectivement). Et je me rappelle distinctement d’une cliente d’un autre café s’enquérir de la présence du «mélange de la Petite Ardoise». Honnêtement, je n’ai aucune idée sur ce que ce mélange comprenait ni sur la maison de torréfaction qui le produisait. Ma mémoire olfactive conserve la trace du «café de la Petite», surtout que le café était la seule chose que je pouvais consommer gratuitement quand j’y travaillais. La dernière fois que j’ai bu un café à La Petite Ardoise, il a titillé ma mémoire gustative mais je crois quand même qu’il a beaucoup changé, au cours des vingt dernières années.

Une autre institution typique, le Santropol (qui est aussi connu pour ses sandwiches et tisanes). Il y a quelques années, le Santropol a commencé à torréfier du café à large échelle et leurs cafés sont désormais disponibles dans les épiceries. Mon souvenir du café au Santropol se mêle à l’image du restaurant lui-même mais je crois me rappeler qu’il était assez représentatif du café à la québécoise.

Il y a plusieurs autres endroit que j’aurais tendance à mettre dans la catégorie «café à la québécoise», depuis La Petite Patrie jusqu’à Westmount, en passant par Villeray et Saint-Henri. Mais l’idée de base est surtout de décrire un type d’endroit. Il y a une question d’ambiance qui entre en ligne de compte mais, du côté du goût du café, la qualité de l’allongé est probablement le facteur le plus déterminant.

Ce qui surprend les plus les amateurs de café (surtout ceux qui ne sont pas nés à Montréal), c’est de savoir que j’ai dégusté des allongés de qualité dans un café de la chaîne Café Dépôt. Pour être honnête, j’étais moi-même surpris, la première fois. En général, les chaînes ont énormément de difficulté à faire du café de très haute qualité, surtout si on considère la nécessité de fournir toutes les succursales avec le même café. Mais je suis retourné à la même succursale de Café Dépôt et, à plusieurs reprises, j’ai pu boire un allongé qui correspond à mes goûts. D’ailleurs, j’aurais dit la même chose de certains cafés dégustés à une succursale de la chaîne Van Houtte. Mais c’était il y a plus de dix ans et Van Houtte semble avoir beaucoup changé depuis.


L’héritage italien des cafés montréalais

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la deuxième section après l’introduction. Cette section se concentre sur la dimension italienne de la scène montréalaise du café.

Comme beaucoup de grandes villes nord-américaines, Montréal a longtemps bénéficié de la présence d’une importante communauté italienne. Les quartiers italiens de Montréal et de ses environs sont d’une vitalité qui fait plaisir à voir, pour quiconque s’intéresse à la vie communautaire. J’ai d’ailleurs lu plusieurs travaux d’étudiants basés sur des Italiens de Montréal et un sens de vie commune était une constante dans tous ces travaux. Pour être franc, j’ai une bouffée de sympathie simplement à penser à tout ça. Peut-être parce que mon arrière-grand-père biologique était un Cerruti? 😉

Donc, il y a un peu d’Italie à Montréal et les Italiens ont su bâtir des communautés serrées. La présence de cafés italiens aux quatre coins de la ville n’a donc rien de surprenant. Mais les implications de cette présence mérite discussion, en ce qui a trait au café.

Faut dire que je suis un peu biaisé. J’ai vraiment découvert le café lors d’un séjour en Suisse, mais c’est en partie grâce à des Italiens que j’avais été initié. Un doux souvenir d’enfance, c’est de me faire servir un pseudo-cappuccino (avec très peu de café) par le cafetier du supermarché Latina, à Cartierville. J’avais aussi le plaisir d’aller manger de la granita maison dans certains cafés italiens disperés à travers la ville. Donc, le simple fait de parler de cafés italiens me rend nostalgique.

Parlant de nostalgie, une institution montréalaise est le Caffè Italia (6840 Saint-Laurent, au cœur de la Petite-Italie). Et c’est un café assez typique de la dimension italienne de la scène montréalaise du café. C’est aussi un des cafés montréalais les plus typiques: non seulement a-t-il été utilisé comme décor pour plusieurs séries télévisées mais son nom a donné son titre à un fascinant documentaire sur les Italiens de Montréal. Le thème musical de ce film, une jolie pièce d’accordéon, a souvent été diffusée sur les ondes de Radio-Canada et a probablement contribué à ma nostalgie.

Mais je pense aussi au Caffè Italia pour son café. Mon père m’y amenait parfois, quand j’étais adolescent, et les cafés au lait que j’y ai bus ont été une base importante de mon appréciation du café.

Au cours des dernières années, près de vingt ans après l’avoir «découvert», je suis retourné au Caffè Italia à quelques reprises. Le café a pratiquement le même goût que dans mes souvenirs et l’ambiance est tout aussi typique. Ce n’est que l’année dernière, plus de dix ans après avoir passé quelques jours à Sienne, que j’ai pu remarquer qu’il y avait du panforte au Caffè Italia.

Le café du Caffè Italia est assez typique de l’espresso à l’italienne. «Mais c’est italien, l’espresso!» Oui, à l’origine. Comme certaines formes de pâtes alimentaires (qui proviennent originellement d’Asie). Mais si l’espresso est toujours associé à l’Italie dans l’esprit de plusieurs, il y a aujourd’hui d’autres conceptions de ce que peut être un espresso. C’est d’ailleurs une des bases de ce que j’essaie de décrire en ce qui concerne la scène du café à Montréal: il nous est désormais possible de déguster tant de l’espresso à l’italienne que d’autres cafés, y compris certains qui méritent pleinement l’appellation «espresso».

Donc, l’espresso à l’italienne, c’est quoi? Sans trop entrer dans le détail technique pour l’instant, c’est généralement un breuvage d’environ une once liquide préparé avec 7 g d’un mélange de cafés arabica et robusta sur une machine à espresso. Généralement, l’espresso à l’italienne peut avoir une amertume assez prononcée. Il est courant de mettre une petite quantité de sucre dans un espresso à l’italienne. Ce même espresso est la base du cappuccino et du «café au lait à l’italienne» (“caffè latte” en italien et en anglais; “café au lait” désigne autre chose en anglais). Ce «café au lait» consiste en un mélange homogène de lait chaud et d’espresso avec, contrairement à l’espresso, peu ou pas de lait moussé.

Enfin, trêve de digressions… 😉

En plus du Caffè Italia, plusieurs cafés de Montréal font l’espresso à l’italienne. Chez les amateurs anglophones de café, deux institutions situées au cœur du Mile-End sont probablement les plus connues: Café Olimpico (aussi appelé “Open Da Night” et “Olympico“) et  Club Social. De mon point de vue, les cafés du Caffè Italia, du Club Social et du Café Olimpico sont assez semblables. J’ai l’impression que la qualité était un peu plus constante chez Olimpico qu’aux deux autres, mais c’est peut-être un hasard.

Mais il y a un grand nombre d’autres cafés italiens à Montréal. Près d’où j’habitais, dans La Petite-Patrie, il y a le Café Genova qui est un digne représentant du «petit café de quartier». À mon avis, le Café Genova est même plus typique que les institutions susmentionnées.

Je pense aussi à plusieurs autres cafés dans différents coins de la ville, de Cartierville à Saint-Léonard, d’Ahuntsic à Outremont. Mais l’idée, ici, c’est pas de faire une liste des cafés de Montréal mais bien de décrire une dimension de la scène montréalaise du café.

Certains de ces cafés attirent une clientèle très locale. Au point qu’il est parfois étrange d’entrer dans un de ces cafés si on n’y connaît personne. C’est d’ailleurs une expérience ethnographique que j’aime bien, qui me fait sentir le sens de communauté. On se fait examiner des pieds à la tête et on nous adresse la parole de façon assez distante. Mais derrière une certaine froideur apparente, on devine un sentiment d’appartenance.

Un aspect intéressant à considérer, c’est que les Italiens de Montréal proviennent surtout du Sud de l’Italie. Puisque la division Nord-Sud de l’Italie est fortement marquée (y compris du point de vue linguistique), l’origine de l’immigration italienne peut être assez pertinente dans toute discussion de cette communauté. Pour le café, d’aucuns disent que les cafés du Sud de l’Italie sont de moins haute qualité que ceux du Nord. N’ayant visité que quelques endroits du Nord de l’Italie (et aucun au Sud), je ne saurais me prononcer. Mais «la rumeur veut que» le café italien montréalais soit moins impressionnant que d’autres cafés italiens à cause de la majorité «sudiste». Ça pourrait expliquer certaines différences que j’ai pu remarqué entre des cafés dégustés en Italie et ce qu’on peut boire dans les cafés italiens de Montréal, mais ça demanderait une analyse plus approfondie.

(Étrangement, j’ai l’impression que tout commentaire laissé sur ce billet va se concentrer sur ce petit détail. Ça serait un peu dommage mais je vais laisser le paragraphe en place, au risque d’avoir des commentaires moins stimulants que ce que j’aimerais avoir…)


Café à la montréalaise: introduction

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Tout d’abord, l’introduction.

Montréal est en passe de (re)devenir une destination pour le café. Mieux encore, la «Renaissance du café à Montréal» risque d’avoir des conséquences bénéfiques pour l’ensemble du milieu culinaire de la métropole québécoise.

Cette thèse peut sembler personnelle et je n’entends pas la proposer de façon dogmatique. Mais en me mêlant au milieu du café à Montréal, j’ai accumulé un certain nombre d’impressions qu’il me ferait plaisir de partager. Il y a même de la «pensée magique» dans tout ça en ce sens qu’il me semble plus facile de rebâtir la scène montréalaise du café si nous avons une idée assez juste de ce qui constitue la spécificité montréalaise.

Je ne tente pas de dire que Montréal devrait être la «capitale du café» ou que Montréal a de l’importance dans le domaine du café. Mais ma ville natale me sert de cas de figure dans l’observation d’une scène culinaire.

Qui suis-je?

D’ailleurs, qui suis-je pour parler ainsi? Essentiellement, un ethnographe montréalais et un avide amateur de café, un «geek de café».

Pour être clair: mon intérêt pour le café est très personnel mais il est fondamental dans ma vie. «Je vis le café». Par contre, je ne suis pas un professionnel du café en ce sens que je n’ai jamais été payé pour quelque activité que ce soit ayant trait au café. J’ai aujourd’hui 36 ans et je bois régulièrement du café depuis l’âge de quinze ans (donc, depuis 1987). Ce qui peut expliquer quelques références nostalgiques à mon adolescence… 😉

Ce qui est amusant, c’est que depuis quelques années j’ai acquis une certaine notoriété dans le milieu du café. Oh, c’est pas grand-chose! Les professionnels du café ne parlent pas de moi entre eux et je n’apparais pas dans des revues spécialisées. Mais mon expertise personnelle sur le café a été reconnue à certaines occasions. J’en tirerais une certaine fierté si ce n’était du fait que tout ce que j’ai fait dans le milieu du café était «tout naturel» pour moi.

Si j’explique tout ça, c’est pas du tout pour me mettre en valeur mais pour donner un certain contexte. Une espèce d’«avertissement» (au sens de “disclaimer“).

Ma formation en ethnographie provient de disciplines académiques (surtout l’anthropologie et la folkloristique) mais j’adopte ici un rôle d’«ethnographe public». Donc, si mes observations sont basées sur une formation académique, elles sont ici effectuées dans un contexte informel, exploratoire. Et c’est quoi, l’ethnographie? Le terme réfère à plusieurs choses mais, essentiellement, c’est un travail de description culturelle. Notre approche de base est l’«observation participante» et je peux dire que j’ai à la fois observé et participé à diverses activités de scènes du café.

Parlant de «scènes de café»… J’aime bien le concept, parce qu’il sous-entend une certaine cohérence sociale (un groupe de gens avec des intérêts communs, dans ce cas-ci) sans évoquer l’homogénéité. La scène montréalaise du café est d’ailleurs assez diversifiée.

Et c’est la base de ce que j’essaie de décrire: la spécificité montréalaise en matière de café passe beaucoup par la diversité.

Pour facilité la lecture, j’ai décidé de diviser ma description en sections.


Café à la montréalaise

Montréal est en passe de (re)devenir une destination pour le café. Mieux encore, la «Renaissance du café à Montréal» risque d’avoir des conséquences bénéfiques pour l’ensemble du milieu culinaire de la métropole québécoise.

Cette thèse peut sembler personnelle et je n’entends pas la proposer de façon dogmatique. Mais en me mêlant au milieu du café à Montréal, j’ai accumulé un certain nombre d’impressions qu’il me ferait plaisir de partager. Il y a même de la «pensée magique» dans tout ça en ce sens qu’il me semble plus facile de rebâtir la scène montréalaise du café si nous avons une idée assez juste de ce qui constitue la spécificité montréalaise.

Continue reading


Intello

C’est un billet un peu difficile à écrire, mais je crois que c’est important pour moi de le laisser sortir.

La difficulté provient du fait que mon ton va probablement sonner opiniâtre. Pire, je risque de froisser la sensibilité de certains. Et pour rendre les choses presque tragiques, je vais parler de façon négative de certains individus. C’est vraiment pas mon genre. Et il n’y a aucun jugement de valeur sur les personnes impliquées. Je pense à des comportements que je trouve quelque peu déplacés et je me sens un certain devoir d’honnêteté et de franchise, à ce sujet. Mais je sais déjà que ça peut paraître insultant.

Les personnes que j’ai choisies sont des «personnalités publiques», habituées à la brûlure de l’opinion publique. Si elles aboutissent sur ce billet, elles le concevront comme un de ces commentaires critiques mal digérés qu’elles ont l’habitude de recevoir, dans leur courrier des lecteurs. Je ne m’inquiète donc pas pour leurs réactions. Les gens qui apprécient ces personnes auront probablement avoir une réaction similaire à celle de leurs idoles. Elles n’auront sans doûte pas l’envie de revenir sur mon blogue, mais je cherche pas à me bâtir un lectorat extensif. Par contre, ce qui m’embête un peu, c’est que mes propos risquent de modifier un peu l’opinion de certaines personnes à mon égard. C’est un risque à prendre mais mes os ne sont pas de verre et le jeu en vaut la chandelle.

Mais avant d’accuser des gens, une mise en contexte.

Comme c’est probablement évident, je réfléchis ces temps-ci aux «intellectuels», à la perception de l’intelligence et à divers personnages sociaux. Le présent billet s’inscrit en continuité assez directe, dans mon esprit, avec trois billets que j’ai écrits au cours des deux derniers mois, dont deux en anglais et un en français.

Dans une certaine mesure, le présent billet me trottait dans la tête pendant que j’écrivais ces autres billets. Je peux entrer dans le vif du sujet: ce qu’est un «intello», selon moi.

Non, je n’utilise pas «intello» comme simple diminutif d’«intellectuel». Et ce n’est pas même une question de préciser des connotations négatives ou positives. Je parle de personnages sociaux distincts. Pour être le plus franc possible, je m’assume en tant qu’«intellectuel» mais je souhaite ardemment ne pas être un «intello». Pour moi, l’«intello» n’a de l’«intellectuel» que l’apparence et non la substance. En somme, l’intello est un «pseudo-intellectuel».

Vous me voyez probablement venir, mais je veux être précis. Je ne parle pas ici de «mauvais intellectuels» ou d’intellectuels que je juge comme inférieurs. Je parle de personne qui adoptent un comportement qui fait appel au personnage de l’intellectuel par pur désir de positionnement social. Bref, des imposteurs.

Le mot est fort mais il me semble d’autant plus approprié qu’il est utilisé pour désigner ce que les coachs de vie appellent «le syndrome de l’imposteur» (“impostor syndrome” ou “imposter syndrome”, en anglais). Je m’intéresse beaucoup à cette notion d’imposture parce que la plupart des descriptions qui en sont faites semblent correspondre très précisémment à quelque-chose que je ressentais de façon très forte jusqu’à tout récemment. D’ailleurs, c’est en passant à travers cette impression d’imposture que j’ai réussi à atteindre de nouveau la sérénité.

C’est quoi, ce «syndrome de l’imposteur»? Eh bien, déjà, c’est pas vraiment un «syndrome». C’est plutôt une façon de décrire un ensemble de phénomènes psychiques qui semblent affecter certaines personnes, surtout celles qui semblent réussir.

La base, c’est un sentiment que notre réussite n’est pas basée sur des capacités concrètes, liées à nos réussites, mais sur la chance, le charme ou une espèce d’inertie. «Si j’atteins ce niveau c’est parce que les gens m’assignent des qualités que je n’ai pas, parce que je suis bien tombé(e), ou parce que je suis simplement resté(e) assez longtemps dans cette position.» Les recherches originales sur ce phénomène, par Clance et Imes, portaient sur des «femmes qui réussissent» (“high achieving women“). Mais le même phénomène se produit chez des hommes.

Après avoir pu identifier ce phénomène chez moi, j’ai non seulement effectué certaines réflexions introspectives mais j’ai eu l’occasion d’en discuter avec plusieurs personnes. Les réactions varient passablement, d’une personne à l’autre. Une personne dont le parcours académique me semble le plus intéressant m’a récemment avoué avoir longtemps souffert de cette impression d’imposture (et je parle de quelqu’un avec beaucoup de prestige). Plusieurs autres personnes ont parlé de ce phénomène comme étant inévitable ou du moins très courant, surtout dans le milieu académique. D’autres encores ont eu une attitude somme toute assez condescendante à l’égard de celles et ceux qui sont affecté(e)s par cette impression d’imposture. Et plusieurs personnes, y compris des psychologues, m’ont permis de trouver une issue personnelle à la paralysie que cette impression semble provoquer.

Et c’est vraiment tout simple: les vrais imposteurs ne se posent pas la question s’ils sont ou non imposteurs.

Je sais pas si c’est une affirmation si valide. Mais cette simple idée m’a beaucoup aidé à comprendre que ce sentiment d’imposture était, du moins dans mon cas, basé sur des critères inappropriés.

Pour revenir à l’intello comme imposteur. D’après moi, l’intello est celui (ou celle, il y a certaines femmes comme ça) qui ne se pose pas de question par rapport à son imposture intellectuelle. Ça semble simpliste, comme définition. Mais, en contexte, ça fonctionne.

Et ça me fait penser à plusieurs représentations de cet intello. Peut-être ma préférée, c’est dans une chanson de Brel sur Les paumés du petit matin (version vidéo, à partir de 3:25). Mon interprétation des paroles de cette chanson tourne autour du fait que les personnages décrits sont des intellos, qui font semblant d’être des intellectuels. Le passage qui me semble le plus pertinent à cet égard:

Ils se racontent à minuit
Les poèmes qu’ils n’ont pas lus
Les romans qu’ils n’ont pas écrits
Les amours qu’ils n’ont pas vécues
Les vérités qui ne servent à rien

Tout de suite, je me mets à me poser toutes sortes de questions par rapport à mes propres agissements. «Ai-je fait ça, moi?» J’ai beau être sorti de l’impasse, j’ai encore certains réflexes. Et le fait est que j’ai déjà discuté de chacun de ces sujets sans en avoir d’expérience directe. Par contre, même si je suis honnête au sujet de mon expérience indirecte, je continue à me poser des questions. Selon mon interprétation de cette chanson de Brel, ceux qu’il décrivait n’étaient ni honnête ni porté à la remise en question.

Un passage, plus tôt dans la chanson, sonne comme une description très directe de ce que craignent ceux qui se croient imposteurs:

Elles elles ont l’arrogance
Des filles qui ont de la poitrine
Eux ils ont cette assurance
Des hommes dont on devine
Que le papa a eu de la chance

La différence, encore là, entre les vrais imposteurs et ceux qui craignent de l’être, c’est dans l’attitude: l’arrogance et l’assurance. Rien de mal avec l’assurance, c’est une attitude qui peut être révélatrice d’une saine estime de soi. Et l’arrogance n’est pas un crime. Mais ce genre d’attitude est la base même de ce que j’ai décrié dans des billets précédents.

Donc, contrairement à l’intellectuel, l’intello fait preuve d’arrogance ou d’assurance excessive. Ça semble clair. Mais est-ce suffisant?

Je sais pas. Surtout que j’ai acquis pas mal d’assurance, au cours des derniers mois, et mon attitude a balancé d’un côté moins humble, pendant un certain temps. C’était une des bases de mon billet sur l’égocentrisme. Je crois par contre être revenu à mon attitude usuelle qui, sans être excessivement humble, n’en est pas arrogante pour autant. Du moins, selon moi. Peut-être ai-je tort et je serais dans ce cas un intello. Soit. Mais, au moins, je réfléchis sérieusement à la question et si je m’assume en tant qu’intellectuel ce n’est pas pour m’affubler d’un titre mais bien pour accepter une étiquette qui m’a collé à la peau toute ma vie.

On revient finalement à ceux que j’accuse d’être des intellos. Et c’est la partie difficile de ce billet, malgré toutes mes précautions. Je n’ai pas encore décidé combien de personnes il me serait approprié de nommer, dans ce contexte. Mais je vais commencer avec deux. Je n’ajouterai pas de liens vers leurs profils parce que mon but n’est pas d’attirer leur attention. Tel que mentionné plus haut, j’ai pas non plus peur qu’elles puissent lire ce billet.

Donc, vous voulez des noms?

[Roulement de tambour…]

Richard Martineau et John C. Dvorak.

Voilà, c’est dit.

Bon, pour ceux qui me connaissent, c’est peut-être pas très surprenant. Et ce sont deux journalistes assez controversés, ce qui m’empêche de craindre de leur causer du tort. Mais, vraiment, je perçois ces deux personnages comme des intellos: des imposteurs de l’intellect.

Martineau me rend la tâche facile. Pour les Québécois francophones, surtout ceux qui connaissent beaucoup de vrais intellectuels, la preuve de l’imposture de Martineau est dans son comportement-même. Pour ceux qui ne le connaissent pas, Richard Martineau peut être décrire comme un chroniqueur au style provocateur qui se prononce sur divers sujets d’actualités à travers diverses tribunes. En d’autres termes, c’est un de ces journaleux qui sont à la fois gueulards (Martineau s’est longtemps affublé du titre de «grande gueule») et susceptibles. C’est le type qui gueule, qui a des propos à l’emporte-pièce, qui se moque des gens et qui ne supporte pas la moindre petite critique, même justifiée et constructive.

Du moins, son personnage. Je parle pas vraiment de Richard Martineau lui-même, que je n’ai jamais rencontré. Je parle de sa persona, du masque social qu’il s’est créé. Tout comme ceux qui craignent d’être imposteurs, Martineau semble avoir des problèmes d’estime de soi. Mais contrairement à ceux qui parlent de souffrir de l’impression d’être des imposteurs, Martineau semble n’avoir s’assumer dans le personnage. Il raconte «des vérités qui ne servent à rien» en revendiquant le droit de le faire. Ce qui fait de lui un personnage désagréable mais qui n’implique rien sur sa personne. Si c’est un rôle qu’il joue, il le joue avec brio et je l’en félicite.

Mon choix de Martineau comme cible de l’étiquette d’«intello» n’est pas complètement anodin. Un des rares propos personnalisé et désobligeants (des «mots d’esprits» à la Ridicule) que j’ai vraiment apprécié, c’est cette phrase de Dany Laferrière:

Richard Martineau vit intellectuellement au-dessus de ses moyens, un jour, il va faire faillite.

Non seulement c’est bien trouvé, mais c’est une analyse pénétrante (“insightful”). C’est aussi très insultant.

Oui, je sais, il y a eu toute une polémique à ce sujet. Mais je n’essaie pas de m’immiscer dans cette polémique. D’ailleurs, c’est pour cette raison que je n’ajoute aucun lien vers les multiples billets de blogues traitant de cette polémique. Mais je crois que ça aide à cerner le concept d’intello: comme un frimeur qui s’achète une bagnole qu’il n’a pas les moyens de s’acheter, l’intello se rend propriétaire d’idées qu’il ne peut soutenir. Je sais pas pour vous, mais je trouve ça très parlant, comme concept. Et même si je trouve que le «Martineau le personnage» est un bon exemple de cette crise intellectuelle, je pense plutôt à des comportements dangereux.

Bon, ma deuxième cible, maintenant: John C. Dvorak. Il est probablement moins connu des Francophones que Martineau qui, lui-même, tient sa notoriété au «Paysage audiovisuel québécois». C’est donc une cible relativement peu risquée pour moi puisque ses fans sont surtout anglophones. Mais je connais personnellement des gens qui l’apprécient, y compris des gens qui liront peut-être ces lignes. Alors il y a quand même un certain risque.

Donc, qui est Dvorak? Pour simplifier, c’est un chroniqueur américain sur les nouvelles technologiques. Un type qui aime bien provoquer en tenant des propos frôlant l’absurdité. Il a parfois été assez explicite sur ses intentions: il provoque les gens pour attirer les lecteurs ou pour obtenir plus de traffic. Dans la logique journaleuse, c’est légitime, mais je crois que c’est aussi une marque d’imposture.

Tout comme avec Martineau, je ne parle pas de l’individu mais bien du personnage. J’ai rien contre Dvorak, que je ne connais pas personnellement. Je le trouve pas spécialement attachant mais j’imagine que j’aurais du plaisir à le rencontrer. Mais je trouve son comportement irrespectueux, méprisant, arrogant et, simplement, inapproprié.

Je pense surtout à ses apparitions sur la baladodiffusion de Leo Laporte, This Week in Tech (TWiT). Mais pas exclusivement. «Dvorak le personnage» est le même, peu importe le contexte. Du moins, c’est l’impression que j’en ai. Sa présence à TWiT est l’objet de discussions, parfois motivée par mes propres réactions. L’idée, c’est que comme Martineau, le personnage est controversé. Ce n’est pas une question de prendre position, pour moi. Mais d’établir un concept.

Comme Martineau, Dvorak est à la fois «grande gueule» et susceptible. Un peu comme Martineau avec Laferrière, Dvorak a eu des difficultés avec Jason Calacanis. Pourtant, Calacanis n’a pas été aussi désobligeant à l’égard de Dvorak que Laferrière a été à l’égard de Martineau. La différence tient peut-être au contexte linguistique (les Anglophones accordent moins d’importance aux «mots d’esprit») mais, aussi, je perçois Calacanis comme quelqu’un de très respectueux et un vrai humaniste. Toujours est-il que, selon ce que j’ai pu comprendre, Dvorak refuse de participer à TWiT si Calacanis est présent. Je crois que le contraire n’est pas vrai: Calacanis semble n’avoir aucune animosité par rapport à Dvorak. Tout au plus, Calacanis s’amuse parfois à imiter Dvorak, ce que Dvorak lui-même fait à l’occasion.

Dvorak est un bougon. C’est un peu le «schtroumpf grognon» de l’actualité technologique. Il participe à une émission intitulée Cranky Geeks, et le terme “cranky” correspond plus ou moins à «irritable» en français. En d’autres termes, il a un «mauvais caractère». Mais cette dimension du personnage n’a que peu d’importance, pour moi, même si c’est un peu la cible de mon billet sur les “curmudgeons”. C’est une attitude que je trouve désagréable et j’ai de la difficulté à lui trouver une valeur positive. Mais je peux accepter cette attitude.

Tant qu’elle n’est pas méprisante.

Selon moi, Dvorak est méprisant et imbu de lui-même. Bien au-delà du style conversationnel à haut engagement (“high involvement style”) dans lequel la parole de l’un peut chevaucher avec la parole de l’autre, John C. Dvorak s’accapare les tours de parole d’une façon si agressive qu’il m’est difficile de croire qu’il ne se prend pas pour l’analyste le plus fin de l’assemblée. Et s’il prétend ramener les intervenants à l’ordre, lors de This Week in Tech, c’est souvent lui qui fait dévier la conversation sur les sujets les plus tangentiels. Oh, j’aime bien les tangentes. Mais la façon dont Dvorak impose ces tangentes me semble littéralement malhonnête.

Et pour revenir au statut d’intello. Dvorak a probablement une intelligence tout à fait raisonnable, selon notre définition de l’intelligence. Je n’ai pas l’impression qu’il manque d’intelligence. Mais, comme Martineau, j’ai l’impression que le personnage comporte une surévaluation de l’intelligence du bonhomme. Dans le cas de Dvorak, c’est surtout une question de faire des prédictions (à l’emporte-pièce), ce qui est parfois considéré comme glorieux quand elles se réalisent (et peut-être pas si désastreux quand elles ne se réalisent pas). Comme Dvorak a fait à peu près n’importe quelle prédiction possible, il devient difficile de le prendre au sérieux. Pas que c’est si important, selon moi, d’être pris au sérieux. Mais, bon, puisque Dvorak parle régulièrement de tout ce qu’il a déjà dit, le personnage donne l’impression que le sérieux est important dans son cas.

Comme avec Martineau, je ne me préoccupe pas tellement de l’individu. Je pense au personnage dans un contexte presque allégorique. Dvorak représente une abstraction de l’intello, celui qui énonce sans écouter. Dvorak est d’ailleurs si insultant et méprisant que le fait de le mettre en parallèle avec Martineau semble insultant pour Martineau. Mais, ça, c’est un personnage.

Un personnage d’intellectuel qui est usurpé par un intello. C’est pas un crime, mais ça mérite un billet.

Et maintenant que je l’écris, ça va me faire plaisir de le publier, sans même le relire, ce billet. C’est exaltant de pouvoir s’exprimer de la sorte.

Bien entendu, je m’attends à recevoir toutes sortes de commentaires désobligeants. Mais je peux vivre avec ça. Encore une fois, mes os ne sont pas de verre.

«»

«»


Ce que mes amis sont devenus

Quelques anciens de Notre-Dame-de-PontmainOn a bien vieilli!

Quelques anciens de Notre-Dame-de-Pontmain

C’est-tu pas une belle gang, ça? Nous étions quelques anciens de l’école primaire Notre-Dame-de-Pontmain de Laval à bruncher ensemble en ce dimanche, 26 octobre 2008. Une journée à marquer d’une pierre blanche.

via Facebook | Photos de Notre-Dame-de-Pontmain

Il y a quelque-chose de profond dans le fait de revoir des amis d’enfance. Vraiment. C’est un peu difficile à verbaliser, mais ça se comprend bien.

Il y a un peu plus d’un an, je me demandais ce que mes amis étaient devenus. Je cherchais alors à contacter quelques personnes pour les inviter à mon anniversaire de mariage. C’est d’ailleurs en préparant cet anniversaire que j’ai parcouru des réseaux d’anciens. Suite à cet anniversaire, j’ai manifesté ma fierté d’avoir des amis si fascinants. Aujourd’hui, je souhaite de nouveau célébrer l’amitié.

Pour un papillon social, c’est pas très surprenant. J’aime entrer en contact avec les gens, que je les aie connus plus tôt ou non. Que voulez-vous, j’aime le monde. Tel que mentionné dans un billet précédent, je me suis autrefois senti ostracisé. Je sais pas s’il y a une causalité entre mon identité comme papillon social et mon enfance, mais je trouve que c’est un pattern intéressant: le type porté vers les autres, qui passe une enfance plutôt solitaire, devient un papillon social à l’âge adulte. L’image de la «chenille sociale» est assez forte aussi!

Outre la publication de cette photo, ce qui me motive à écrire ce billet c’est Facebook. Si si! Parce que ce petit groupe d’anciens poursuit la discussion. Parce qu’on se «retrouve», dans un sens très profond, grâce à Facebook. Et parce que j’ai revisité ma liste d’amis sur Facebook et je suis encore plus fier.

Voyez-vous, je créais une «liste d’amis» sur Facebook, pour ces anciens du primaire. Cette fonction de liste d’amis sur Facebook est un peu limitée mais elle peut être utile si, comme tout semble l’indiquer, notre groupe d’anciens décide d’organiser d’autres événements. Pour organiser le brunch, j’ai fait parvenir une invitation à tous les membres du groupe Facebook des anciens de notre école alors que j’aurais mieux fait de cibler ceux de ma «cohorte». C’est un petit détail pratique, mais ça m’a permis de réfléchir.

Parce qu’en créant cette liste d’amis, je me suis rendu compte à quel point j’ai une idée assez précise de ce qui me lie à chacun de mes contacts sur Facebook. Dans ce cas-ci, j’ai rapidement pu sélectionner ceux que j’ai rencontrés au primaire, ceux que j’ai connus au secondaire et ceux avec qui je suis allé au Cégep. Parmi les autres, il y a des blogueurs, des musiciens, des spécialistes de la bière et/ou du café, des collègues du milieu académique, quelques amis de mes amis, quelques anciens étudiants et quelques personnes qui ont manifesté un intérêt spécifique à mon égard. Pour le reste, ce sont des gens que j’ai rencontré en-ligne ou hors-ligne, généralement dans un contexte spécifique. Sur 471 contacts que j’ai sur Facebook à l’heure actuelle, moins d’une trentaine (27, pour être précis) que je n’étais pas en mesure d’identifier immédiatement. Parmi eux, peut-être trois ou quatre par rapport auxquels persiste une certaine ambiguïté. Et plusieurs personnes qui font partie de mon réseau direct mais que je n’ai pas rencontré très directement. En d’autres termes, des gens avec qui j’ai des liens moins étroits mais dont la présence dans mon réseau social est «pleine de sens», surtout si on pense aux fameux «liens faibles» (“weak ties”). D’ailleurs, ces liens faibles constituent une part importante de ce que j’ai tendance à appeler «l’effet du papillon social», par référence à l’effet papillon d’Edward Lorenz. Pour mémoire (selon TF1):

Prévisibilité : est-ce que le battement des ailes d’un papillon au Brésil peut déclencher une tornade au Texas?

Enfin… J’inclue surtout cette citation pour conserver quelques notes au sujet de cet effet. C’est une sorte de digression assez égoïste.

Toujours est-il que… Nous disions donc… Ah… Oui!

«Retrouver» mes amis, mes connaissances, mes liens, ça fait battre mes ailes de papillon social.

Flap flap!


More Notes on Myriade

Like all my recent posts, this post about my first coffee-tasting session at Myriade followed the RERO principle: not only was it a draft but I expect to come back to it. I could update the post itself but I think it’s useful to post a few more notes about Myriade’s first day, especially since I did go back to the café in the meantime.

via First Myriade Session « Disparate

So…

First factual point: all of Myriade’s espresso drinks are based on double-shots. It doesn’t surprise me given the fact that it’s pretty much the epitome of coffee’s so-called Third Wave and double-espresso is the very basis of West Coast-style Third Wave coffee. But I still assumed they would be pulling singles as well as doubles. A corrollary of this is that their extra shot makes for a triple.

Speaking of extras… Myriade’s menus are rather unique, IMHO. Not really because of specific items which aren’t found elsewhere or because of the price structure. The way the whole set of menus work together. It’s precisely the kind of thing a business-savvy person would notice and grok right away. I merely notice it. If I had had a camera (and the fine folks at Myriade had let me), I would have posted pictures of those menus (which happen to look pretty nice, and fit into the café’s overall design). There’s something there; I can’t put my finger on it; but it’s there.

I’m not sure what my friend Chris Capell’s official job title may be. He does seem to work there as a manager, but calling him the “manager” might have been stretching a bit. Not sure about that.

Though it should be obvious from the link I used for Scott Rao, I should have mentioned that Rao is the author of The Professional Barista’s Handbook. Fittingly, Scott’s book is available for sale at Myriade. I haven’t the book yet (I’m no barista, even though I played a barista judge before), but I’ve heard very good things about it. This specific book was discussed at length in episode 61 (27:30-31:34, MP3) of the CoffeeGeek Podcast (XML). Unfortunately, however, Mark Prince‘s review of that book has yet to appear online. Hopefully, that review will appear before the well-known CoffeeGeek editor comes to Montreal.

On my second trip to Myriade today, after writing that previous post, I got a chance to try a few different things. I did tweet about one:

Having Mei Shan oolong at Myriade. Getting seaweed, black currant, puffed rice, bit of grass. Perfect complement for the Taiwanese meal I just had. (Tweet)

The Taiwanese meal was the deep fried pork chops from Bao Dao Taiwan, at Faubourg Sainte-Catherine. That place happens to be one of my favourite food court places in town (along with that one Thai Express location at Carrefour Industrielle-Alliance). The seaweed I got in that tea really made for a great complement because that meal did have seaweed in it. This combination is one I want to repeat. Either I ask Myriade for the right to bring my Bao Dao meal to eat there or I get this Mei Shan to go, and bring it to Faubourg.

On that second trip to Myriade, I also had the occasion to take a couple of sips of the Miralvalle brewed through another method and what struck me that time was vanilla chocolate. Very different from the Eva Solo I’ve had of the Miralvalle, earlier. Given my passion for flavour diversity, this was a pleasant experience.

The last thing I’ve had at Myriade today was a mixture of honey, lemon, ginger, and water. It was described as a drink popular in New Zealand and it tasted pretty much like a high-quality version of what I know as a grog, without the rum. Knowing that Kiwis have a special relationship with alcohol, I’m assuming this same drink is frequently served with rum, over in Lambland.

As you can tell, I can’t stop talking about Myriade. One thing which is great for me is that I now have two good reasons to spend time on Concordia campus (the other one being that I teach at Concordia). I sincerely think that Myriade’s presence in the neighbourhood will help me do more at Concordia, in the coming months. In fact, I’ve written the previous blogpost from my office and I had a chance to chat with one of my office-mates who tends not to overlap that much with me. If, thanks to Myriade, I end up spending time on campus every day, I’m sure to have more opportunities to talk with more Concordia people. The neat thing about this is that I really like Concordia.

As a Montrealer and a coffee geek, I can just tell that Myriade’s future is bright. No, it’s not wishful thinking. Even if it is, Myriade will still work. 😉 One sign of this is that some key members of Montreal’s coffee scene were at Myriade today and everybody seemed really enthusiastic. As I keep saying, this is Montreal’s Coffee Renaissance. I sincerely think that “all the chips are on the table” and that the time is ripe for this rebirth in coffee enthusiasm. As World Barista Champion Stephen Morrissey has said (or so I heard), during the Canadian Barista Championship in Montreal, coffee is the ideal drink for culinary enthusiasts of all kinds (foodies, chowhounds, etc.) during these tough financial times. Just about any food enthusiast in a post-industrial society (i.e. OECD members) can easily “splurge” on a very fine coffee without making that big a hole in their budget and some people in GDP-poor contexts can eventually get quality coffee, especially if culinary coffee ends up improving the deal for coffee growers.

Call me an idealist all you want, I think this rosy picture I’m drawing makes quite a bit of sense! 😎


Four-Hundred Years

So, apparently, today is Quebec City’s actual 400th birthday:

Samuel de Champlain — Britannica Online Encyclopedia

The whole year is designated as «Le 400è de Québec» so it’s interesting to have a precise date.

Obviously, we could quibble as to the significance of any given date. And there’s a lot to say about the negative impact of colonialism. So, the title refers to Bob Marley as much as to Quebec City’s celebration.


Judging Eastern Canadian Espresso

For an ethnographer, it’s always a treat to gain entry in a new group. These past few days, I was given a glimpse, and possibly even some new contacts, into an espresso scene which includes dedicated coffee professionals from diverse regions.

I was acting as a sensory judge for the Eastern Regional competition of the Canadian Barista Championship, right here in Montreal.

Part of this event was blogged:

» Blog Archive » Bravo Montreal!

Though the event was held on Sunday (June 15) and Monday (June 16), I haven’t been able to report back on the experience until today. And I still haven’t completely debriefed with myself about this.

A general comment I can make is that there does seem to be a move toward an enhanced espresso scene in Eastern Canada. And although this recent competition’s first place was given to a barista from Ottawa (sincere congratulations, Laura!), I maintain that Montreal can be at the centre of a coffee renaissance.

Of course, I’m completely biased. And I’ve been talking about this same issue for a while. What is new, for me, is direct experience in Montreal’s espresso scene. Participant-observation in a very literal sense.

As a personal aside: though it’s the furthest thing from what I try to be, some people tend to find me intimidating, in daily life. As a judge, I was apparently quite intimidating, even to people who already knew me. I usually feel weird when people find me intimidating but, given the context, the reaction seems quite appropriate. I had to maintain a straight face and to refrain from interacting with competitors throughout the competition. Though it was a bit hard to do at first, it seems to have worked. And I felt very consistent, fair, and impartial throughout the competition.

Also somewhat personal, but more directly related to the task at hand, being a judge required me to temporarily change my perspective on espresso. Specifically, I had to separate my personal taste from the competition calibration. This barista championship has some strict guidelines, taken from the World Barista Championship. We weren’t judging whether or not the espresso was flavourful or complex. We were assessing the degree to which baristas were able to produce espresso which responded to some very specific criteria. To this ethical hedonist, it was a challenge. But it wasn’t as difficult a challenge as I expected.

Since my approach to food and beverages is based on reflective olfaction, the fact that aromas weren’t part of the judging calibration seemed especially surprising to me.

Obviously, I observed a lot more. And I could blog about my perception of the competitors. Yet because I was acting as a judge, talking about specific competitors would seem unethical. On the other hand, I will have occasions to talk with some former competitors and give them my impression of their work. This should be quite fun.

So, overall, I’m quite grateful to everyone involved for an occasion to get a glimpse into a part of Eastern Canada’s espresso scene.

Should be fun during the national competition of the Canadian Barista Championship, which will be held on October 21 and 21, during the Canadian Coffee & Tea Show. Not sure I’ll be a judge then, but I’m convinced it’ll be a fine event.


And We’re Still Lecturing

Forty years ago this month, students in Paris started a movement of protests and strikes. May ’68.

Among French-speakers, the events are remembered as the onset of a cultural revolution of sorts (with both negative and positive connotations). As we reached the 40 year anniversary of those events, some journalists and commentators have looked back at the social changes associated with the Paris student revolts of May, 1968.

The May ’68 movement also had some pedagogical bases. Preparing an online course, these days, I get to think about learning. And to care about students.

As I was yet to be born at the time, May ’68 resonates more for generational reasons than pedagogical ones. But a Montreal journalist who observed some of those events 40 years ago has been talking about what she perceived as irrationality surrounding such issues as abolishing lecture-based courses («cours magistraux»).

This journalist’s reaction and a cursory comparison of the present situation with what I’ve heard of pre-1968 teaching both lead me on a reflection path about learning. Especially in terms of lecturing.

As a social constructivist, I have no passion for “straight lectures.” On occasion, I bemoan the fact that lecturing is (still) the primary teaching mode in many parts of the world. The pedagogical ideas forcefully proposed more than a generation ago are apparently not prevalent in most mainstream educational systems.

What happened?

This is an especially difficult question for an idealist like me. We wish for change. Change happens. Then, some time later, changes have been reversed. Maybe more progressively. But, it seems, inexorably.

Sisyphean. Or, maybe, buddhist.

Is it really the way things work?

Possibly. But I prefer to maintain my idealism.

So… Before I was born, some baby-booming students in Paris revolted against teaching practises. We still talk about it. Nowadays, these teaching practises against which students revolted are apparently quite common in Paris universities. As they are in many other parts of the world. But not exactly everywhere.

Online learning appears more compatible with teaching methods inspired by social constructivism (and constructionism) than with “straight lecturing.” My idealism for alternative learning methods is fed partly by online learning.

Online lectures are possible. Yet the very structure of online communication implies some freedoms in the way lecture attendees approach these “teachings.”

At the very least, online lectures make few requirements in terms of space. Technically, a student could be watching online lectures while laying down on a beach. Beaches sound like a radically different context from the large lecture halls out of which some ’68ers decided to “take to the streets.”

Contrary to classroom lectures, online lectures may allow time-shifting. In some cases, prerecorded lectures (or podcasts) may be paused, rewinded, fastforwarded, etc. Learning for the TiVo generation?

Online lectures also make painfully obvious the problems with straight lecturing. The rigid hierarchy. Students’ relative facelessness. The lack of interactivity. The content focus. All these work well for “rote learning.” But there are other ways to learn.

Not that memorization plays no part in learning or that there is no value in the “retention of [a text’s] core information” (Schaefer 2008: xxi). It’s just that… Many of us perceive learning to be more than brain-stuffing.

As should be obvious from my tone and previous posts, I count myself as one of those who perceive lectures to be too restrictive. Oh, sure, I’ve lectured to large and medium-sized classrooms. In fact, I even enjoy lecturing when I get to do it. And I fully realize that there are many possible approaches to teaching. In fact, my observation is that teaching methods are most effective when they are adapted to a specific situation, not when they follow some set of general principles. In this context, lecturing may work well when “lecturer and lecturees are in sync.” When students and teacher are “on the same page,” lectures can be intellectually stimulating, thought-provoking, challenging, useful. Conversely, alternative teaching methods can have disastrous consequences when they are applied haphazardly by people who were trained with “straight lecturing” in mind. In fact, my perception is that many issues with Quebec’s most recent education reform (the “competency based program” about which Quebec parents have been quite vocal) are associated with the indiscriminate application of constructivist/constructionist principles to all learning contexts in the province. IMHO, a more flexible application of the program coupled with considerate teacher training might have prevented several of the problems which plagued Quebec’s reform.

Unlike ’68ers, I don’t want to abolish lectures. I just hope we can adopt a diversity of methods in diverse contexts.

Back in 1968, my father was a student of Jean Piaget, in Geneva. Many of Piaget’s ideas about learning were quite compatible with what Parisian students were clamoring for.

Beyond the shameless name-dropping, my mentioning Piaget relates to something I perceive as formative. Both in my educational and in my personal lives. My mother had much more of an impact on my life. But my father supplied me with something of the Piaget spirit. And this spirit is found in different places. Including online.

The compatibility between online learning and lecture-less teaching methods seems to be a topic for frequent discussions among eLearning circles including LearnHubNing, and the Moodle community. Not that online technology determines pedagogical methods. But the “fit” of online technology with different approaches to learning and teaching is the stuff constructionist teachers’ dreams are made of.

One dimension of the “fit” is in terms of flexibility. Online, learners may (and are sometimes forced to) empower themselves using personal methods. Not that learners are left to their own devices. But the Internet is big and “wild” enough to encourage survival strategies in learning contexts. Perhaps more than the lecture hall, the online world makes critical thinking vital. And critical thinking may lead to creative and innovative solutions.
Another dimension to the fit, and one which may be more trivial than some EdTech enthusiasts seem to assume, is the “level of interactivity” afforded diverse online tools. You know, the Flash-based or other learning objects which should make learning fun and effective. I personally like the dancing mice a lot. But my impression is that these cool tools require too much effort for their possible learning outcomes. I do, however, have high hopes for the kind of interactivity common to the “social platform” sometimes known (perhaps abusively) as “Web 2.0.” Putting things online is definitely not a panacea for adequate pedagogical practise. And while “School 2.0” is an interesting concept, the buzzwordiness of some of these concepts makes me take pause. But, clearly, some students are using adequate learning strategies through the interactive character of online communication.

As I’ll be teaching online for several weeks, I’ll surely have many other things to say about these learning issues in a pseudo-historical context. In the meantime, I assume that this blogpost may bring me some thoughtful comments. 😉


MuniWiFi in Rural Quebec

Municipalité de Nouvelle Miguasha Gaspésie Québec Canada

Nouvelle, a rather small village of 2000 inhabitants in Eastern Quebec, is rolling out an inexpensive plan for municipal wireless using WiMAX.

MuniWiFi has often been criticised, especially in the United States. Some plans, especially in large cities, have been pegged as anti-competitive and “bad for business.” Sprint Nextel’s involvement in WiMAX  is possibly being reconsidered. But the Nouvelle plan seems different.

In this case, the municipality isn’t competing with a private provider since wiring up the region wouldn’t be profitable for a private provider anyway. According to a short report on a tech podcast over at Radio-Canada, the plan is to integrate the WiMax plan as a utility on residents’ tax bill. Apparently, the plan would cost 50$ (CAD) a year for each household.

Given the current economic conditions for remote parts of Quebec, this could easily be the beginning of a new trend. Not that a small village would suddenly be transformed into a hub of tech expertise. But opportunities for telecommuting can eventually reverse the trend toward “rural exodus.” Some comment writers on the Radio-Canada piece mention the possibility to bring young people back to rural areas in Quebec. In fact, there’s currently a government-sponsored campaign to get young people to move away from urban areas back into rural areas. Similar campaigns exist to get newcomers (immigrants and migrants) to move to those areas. Much of these campaigns might have more to do with employment than with anything else and the notion seems to be that the best way to attract anyone to those regions is to have good employment opportunities.

At the same time, some urbanites are moving to those regions. Gaspésie, where this WiFi-savvy village is located, is one such region which attracts increasing number of wealthy urbanites who move there to avoid the stresses of city life. The result is often that real-estate prices are going up for the most desirable places, making it more difficult for young locals to get their own propriety. It also seems that some urbanites fail to engage in the local communities to which they moved, thereby creating some tension between individuals in those communities.