Tag Archives: cultural contacts

Culture and Health: Contact and Coverage

It’s late in the game, as the story has already made the rounds, but I guess I was under a rock.

FUNAI, a Brazilian foundation which aims to help indigenous groups, has released pictures of a relatively isolated group in the Amazon region. Apparently, the purpose of those pictures was to show how healthy these people seemed to be, contrary to folk beliefs about indigenous groups. These folk beliefs are widespread in post-industrial societies and seem to relate to basic ethnocentrism.

Some major media outlets released those same pictures with captions and other comments about allegedly “uncontacted tribes.” Through the “telephone game,” the same images became part of an awkwardly anachronistic coverage of cultural diversity, many comments being made from a resolutely neo-evolutionist perspective. A whole debacle ensued. Several anthropologists have been contacted to comment on the situation.

So far, the most thoughtful piece of writing I’ve seen about the whole situation is this one:

‘Uncontacted Indians?!’ — contact an anthropologist! « Culture Matters

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if media debacles such as this one could be avoided? One would hope that a good dose of critical thinking and some thoughtful blogging might help.


Culinary Exploration

Just saw most of a documentary about Mark Brownstein, a former landscaper from the United States now living in Hong Kong. Brownstein started a business based on culinary exploration throughout East and Southeast Asia.

foodhunter by alongmekong productions

It would be rather easy to criticize both documentary and subject. The film itself pays lip-service to issues such as the possible exploitative nature of Brownstein’s business without delving very deeply into it. Is Brownstein the Ry Cooder of Southeast Asian cuisine?

Yet there are interesting issues which go beyond the movie, especially for those interested in food and culture.

As another blogger has it, the film itself is visually pleasing. And it does help us understand the amazing complexity of a few of Asia’s diverse foodways. And it does address issues related to food and globalization.

Will have to see this film again and explore Brownstein’s work a bit more carefully.